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What is expected of higher education graduates in the 21st century?

Author

Listed:
  • Humburg, M.

    (Research Centre for Educ and Labour Mark)

  • van der Velden, R.K.W.

    (Research Centre for Educ and Labour Mark)

Abstract

In this paper, we reflect on the skills higher education graduates are expected to have in today’s economy and the role of higher education in equiping graduates with these skills. First, we identify 6 trends which form the basis of the changing role of graduates in economic life. These trends are the knowledge society, increasing uncertainty, the ICT revolution, high performance workplaces, globalization, and the change of the economic structure. By changing the nature and range of tasks graduates are expected to fulfil in today’s economy, we argue that these trends generate new and intensify traditional skill demands, which we summarize as professional expertise, flexibility, innovation and knowledge management, mobilization of human resources, international orientation, and entrepreneurship. Second, we draw out some key issues concerning the role of higher education institutions in equiping graduates with these skills.

Suggested Citation

  • Humburg, M. & van der Velden, R.K.W., 2013. "What is expected of higher education graduates in the 21st century?," Research Memorandum 044, Maastricht University, Graduate School of Business and Economics (GSBE).
  • Handle: RePEc:unm:umagsb:2013044
    DOI: 10.26481/umagsb.2013044
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. DiPrete, Thomas A. & Goux, Dominique & Maurin, Eric & Quesnel-Vallée, Amélie, 2003. "Work and pay in flexible and regulated labor markets: A generalized perspective on institutional evolution and inequality trends in Europe and the US," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Labor Market Policy and Employment SP I 2003-109, WZB Berlin Social Science Center.
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    Cited by:

    1. Humburg, Martin & van der Velden, Rolf, 2015. "Skills and the graduate recruitment process: Evidence from two discrete choice experiments," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 24-41.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I25 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Economic Development
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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