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Globalization, Offshoring and Economic Insecurity in Industrialized Countries

  • William Milberg
  • Deborah Winkler

This paper shows that a “new wave of globalization,” involving extensive offshoring, has raised both actual and perceived labor market insecurity in industrialized countries. The paper analyzes various channels through which this new wave of globalization leads to economic insecurity. It emphasises the key role of overall macroeconomic conditions in determining the outcome of offshoring. The paper points out the inadequacies of various policy responses that industrialized countries have come up with so far and advocates urgent steps toward formulation of policies and erection of institutional structure more appropriate to confront the challenges of the new of globalization.

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File URL: http://www.un.org/esa/desa/papers/2009/wp87_2009.pdf
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Paper provided by United Nations, Department of Economics and Social Affairs in its series Working Papers with number 87.

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Length: 32 pages
Date of creation: Nov 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:une:wpaper:87
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.un.org/en/development/desa/working-papers.html
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  1. Marianna Belloc, 2004. "Do Labor Market Institutions Affect International Comparative Advantage? An Empirical Investigation," Department of Economics University of Siena 444, Department of Economics, University of Siena.
  2. Engelbert Stockhammer, 2000. "Financialization and the Slowdown of Accumulation," Working Papers geewp14, Vienna University of Economics and Business Research Group: Growth and Employment in Europe: Sustainability and Competitiveness.
  3. Richard G. Anderson & Charles S. Gascon, 2007. "The perils of globalization: offshoring and economic insecurity of the American worker," Working Papers 2007-004, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
  4. Ann Harrison & Margaret McMillan, 2011. "Offshoring Jobs? Multinationals and U.S. Manufacturing Employment," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 93(3), pages 857-875, August.
  5. Minsik Choi, 2001. "Threat Effect of Foreign Direct Investment on Labor Union Wage Premium," Working Papers wp27, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
  6. Berman, Eli & Bound, John & Griliches, Zvi, 1994. "Changes in the Demand for Skilled Labor within U.S. Manufacturing: Evidence from the Annual Survey of Manufactures," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 109(2), pages 367-97, May.
  7. Mündler, Marc-Andreas & Becker, Sascha O., 2006. "Margins of multinational labor substitution," Discussion Paper Series 1: Economic Studies 2006,24, Deutsche Bundesbank, Research Centre.
  8. Machin, Stephen & Manning, Alan, 1996. "Employment and the Introduction of a Minimum Wage in Britain," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 106(436), pages 667-76, May.
  9. Ekholm, Karolina & Hakkala, Katariina, 2006. "The Effect of Offshoring on Labour Demand: Evidence from Sweden," CEPR Discussion Papers 5648, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  10. Horgos, Daniel, 2007. "Labor Market Effects of International Outsourcing: How Measurement Matters," Working Paper 62/2007, Helmut Schmidt University, Hamburg.
  11. Wood, Adrian, 1995. "North-South Trade, Employment and Inequality: Changing Fortunes in a Skill-Driven World," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198290155, March.
  12. Catherine L. Mann, 2003. "Globalization of IT Services and White Collar Jobs: The Next Wave of Productivity Growth," Policy Briefs PB03-11, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
  13. Robert Feenstra & Gordon Hanson, 2001. "Global Production Sharing and Rising Inequality: A Survey of Trade and Wages," NBER Working Papers 8372, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  14. Jeffrey D. Sachs & Howard J. Shatz, 1994. "Trade and Jobs in Manufacturing," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 25(1), pages 1-84.
  15. Paul A. Samuelson, 2004. "Where Ricardo and Mill Rebut and Confirm Arguments of Mainstream Economists Supporting Globalization," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 18(3), pages 135-146, Summer.
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