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Labour Market Flexibility and Decent Work

  • Gerry Rodgers

This paper reviews evidence from both industrialized and developing countries on the re1ationship between labour market flexibility and employment. It is argued that the notion of flexibility and its impact is often oversimplified. The evidence, such as it is, does not provide much support for the view that greater flexibility results in higher employment. There is more evidence for an impact on the distribution of employment among different groups of the population, but also effects which vary widely between countries. Flexibility needs to be considered within a wider framework of policies and institutions to promote decent work.

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File URL: http://www.un.org/esa/desa/papers/2007/wp47_2007.pdf
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Paper provided by United Nations, Department of Economics and Social Affairs in its series Working Papers with number 47.

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Length: 11 pages
Date of creation: Jul 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:une:wpaper:47
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.un.org/en/development/desa/working-papers.html
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  1. Carmen Pagés-Serra & Gustavo Márquez, 1998. "Ties That Bind: Employment Protection and Labor Market Outcomes in Latin America," Research Department Publications 4118, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  2. Stephen Devereux, 2005. "Can minimum wages contribute to poverty reduction in poor countries?," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(7), pages 899-912.
  3. Dean Baker & Andrew Glyn & David Howell & John Schmitt, 2002. "Labor Market Institutions and Unemployment: A Critical Assessment of the Cross-Country Evidence," SCEPA working paper series. SCEPA's main areas of research are macroeconomic policy, inequality and poverty, and globalization. 2002-17, Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis (SCEPA), The New School.
  4. John Schmitt & Jonathan Wadsworth, 2002. "Is the OECD Jobs Strategy Behind US and British Employment and Unemployment Success in the 1990s?," SCEPA working paper series. SCEPA's main areas of research are macroeconomic policy, inequality and poverty, and globalization. 2002-06, Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis (SCEPA), The New School.
  5. Gustavo Márquez & Carmen Pagés-Serra, 1998. "Ties That Bind: Employment Protection and Labor Market Outcomes in Latin America," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 4098, Inter-American Development Bank.
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