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The habit for voting, “civic duty” and travel distance

  • Tim Powlowski

    ()

    (University of Tübingen)

  • Dennis Coates

    ()

    (UMBC)

There is a rich literature addressing the paradox of not voting and election turnout from both theoretical and empirical perspectives. By taking advantage of a unique dataset from an “experimental” setting, this paper is the first to estimate the utility that drives the “civic duty” or the habit for voting. Consistent with the general turnout literature, education level, marital status, household size, and distance all affect the persistence of voter participation.

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File URL: http://www.umbc.edu/economics/wpapers/wp_13_05.pdf
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Paper provided by UMBC Department of Economics in its series UMBC Economics Department Working Papers with number 13-05.

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Length: 26 pages
Date of creation: Jun 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:umb:econwp:1305
Contact details of provider: Postal: UMBC Department of Economics 1000 Hilltop Circle Baltimore MD 21250, USA
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Web page: http://www.umbc.edu/economics

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  1. Richard Cebula & Michael Toma, 2006. "Determinants of Geographic Differentials in the Voter Participation Rate," Atlantic Economic Journal, International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 34(1), pages 33-40, March.
  2. Fort, Rodney, 1995. " A Recursive Treatment of the Hurdles to Voting," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 85(1-2), pages 45-69, October.
  3. Mutsusaka, J.G. & Palda, F., 1991. "The Downsian Voter Meets the Ecological Fallacy," Papers 91-30, Southern California - School of Business Administration.
  4. Timothy Feddersen & Alvaro Sandroni, 2006. "A Theory of Participation in Elections," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(4), pages 1271-1282, September.
  5. Egon Franck, . "Private Firm, Public Corporation or Member`s Association – Governance Structures in European Football," Working Papers 0106, University of Zurich, Institute for Strategy and Business Economics (ISU).
  6. Knack, Steve, 1994. " Does Rain Help the Republicans? Theory and Evidence on Turnout and the Vote," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 79(1-2), pages 187-209, April.
  7. Gibson, John & Kim, Bonggeun & Stillman, Steven & Boe-Gibson, Geua, 2011. "Time to Vote?," IZA Discussion Papers 5854, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    • John Gibson & Bonggeun Kim & Steven Stillman & Geua Boe-Gibson, 2013. "Time to vote?," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 156(3), pages 517-536, September.
  8. Timothy J. Feddersen, 2004. "Rational Choice Theory and the Paradox of Not Voting," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 18(1), pages 99-112, Winter.
  9. Anthony Downs, 1957. "An Economic Theory of Political Action in a Democracy," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 65, pages 135.
  10. Stephen Coate & Michael Conlin, 2004. "A Group Rule–Utilitarian Approach to Voter Turnout: Theory and Evidence," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(5), pages 1476-1504, December.
  11. Barry Nalebuff & Roni Shachar, 1997. "Follow The Leader: Theory And Evidence On Political Participation," Yale School of Management Working Papers ysm57, Yale School of Management.
  12. Richard G. Niemi & Michael J. Hanmer, 2010. "Voter Turnout Among College Students: New Data and a Rethinking of Traditional Theories," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 91(2), pages 301-323.
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