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Residential Segregation Effects on Poor’s Opportunities in Chile


  • Osvaldo Larrañaga Jiménez
  • Claudia Sanhueza Riveros


This paper aims to identify whether or not the spatial concentration of poverty –also called economic residential segregation- affects the opportunities of the poor in Chile. Residential segregation is understood as the concentration particular population groups in determined geographical areas within cities. To identify the effects of segregation we use a panel of cross sections of the Casen household surveys, although the measures of segregation are computed from the Census data. The results suggest that segregation makes more likely that children from poor households do not attend preschool education, lag behind grades in school and drop out from schools. Segregation also makes more likely that the non student young from poor households do not participate in the labor force. On the other hand, segregation does not seem to have an effect on the probabilities of teenage pregnancy, young single mothers or the health status of the working age population.

Suggested Citation

  • Osvaldo Larrañaga Jiménez & Claudia Sanhueza Riveros, 2007. "Residential Segregation Effects on Poor’s Opportunities in Chile," Working Papers wp259, University of Chile, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:udc:wpaper:wp259

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Collins, William J. & Margo, Robert A., 2000. "Residential segregation and socioeconomic outcomes: When did ghettos go bad?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 69(2), pages 239-243, November.
    2. Jeffrey R. Kling & Jens Ludwig & Lawrence F. Katz, 2005. "Neighborhood Effects on Crime for Female and Male Youth: Evidence from a Randomized Housing Voucher Experiment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 120(1), pages 87-130.
    3. Charles F. Manski, 2000. "Economic Analysis of Social Interactions," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(3), pages 115-136, Summer.
    4. Yannis M. Ioannides & Linda Datcher Loury, 2004. "Job Information Networks, Neighborhood Effects, and Inequality," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 42(4), pages 1056-1093, December.
    5. William A. Brock & Steven N. Durlauf, 2002. "A Multinomial-Choice Model of Neighborhood Effects," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(2), pages 298-303, May.
    6. Case, A.C. & Katz, L.F., 1991. "The Company You Keep: The Effects Of Family And Neighborhood On Disadvantaged Younths," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1555, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
    7. Lawrence F. Katz & Jeffrey R. Kling & Jeffrey B. Liebman, 2001. "Moving to Opportunity in Boston: Early Results of a Randomized Mobility Experiment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 116(2), pages 607-654.
    8. Aizer, Anna & Currie, Janet, 2004. "Networks or neighborhoods? Correlations in the use of publicly-funded maternity care in California," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(12), pages 2573-2585, December.
    9. Ludwig, Jens & Duncan, Greg J. & Pinkston, Joshua C., 2005. "Housing mobility programs and economic self-sufficiency: Evidence from a randomized experiment," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(1), pages 131-156, January.
    10. Vartanian, Thomas P. & Gleason, Philip M., 1999. "Do neighborhood conditions affect high school dropout and college graduation rates?," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 21-41.
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    Cited by:

    1. Inder J. Ruprah & Luis Marcano, 2007. "A Meta-Impact Evaluation of Social Housing Programs: The Chilean Case," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 2834, Inter-American Development Bank.


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