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A Multinomial-Choice Model of Neighborhood Effects


  • William A. Brock
  • Steven N. Durlauf


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  • William A. Brock & Steven N. Durlauf, 2002. "A Multinomial-Choice Model of Neighborhood Effects," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(2), pages 298-303, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:92:y:2002:i:2:p:298-303 Note: DOI: 10.1257/000282802320189438

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Charles F. Manski, 1993. "Identification of Endogenous Social Effects: The Reflection Problem," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 60(3), pages 531-542.
    2. Ivar Ekeland & James J. Heckman & Lars Nesheim, 2004. "Identification and Estimation of Hedonic Models," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 112(S1), pages 60-109, February.
    3. William A. Brock, 1993. "Pathways to randomness in the economy: Emergent nonlinearity and chaos in economics and finance," Estudios Económicos, El Colegio de México, Centro de Estudios Económicos, vol. 8(1), pages 3-55.
    4. William A. Brock & Steven N. Durlauf, 2001. "Discrete Choice with Social Interactions," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 68(2), pages 235-260.
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    Cited by:

    1. Morey, Edward R. & Kritzberg, David, 2012. "It's not where you do it, it's who you do it with?," Journal of choice modelling, Elsevier, vol. 5(3), pages 176-191.
    2. Semih Tumen & Tugba Zeydanli, 2015. "Is Happiness Contagious? Separating Spillover Externalities from the Group-Level Social Context," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 16(3), pages 719-744, June.
    3. Keith Head & Thierry Mayer, 2008. "Detection Of Local Interactions From The Spatial Pattern Of Names In France," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(1), pages 67-95.
    4. Marini, Annalisa, 2016. "Immigrants, Trust and Social Traps," MPRA Paper 69627, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Feb 2016.
    5. Wydick, Bruce & Karp Hayes, Harmony & Hilliker Kempf, Sarah, 2011. "Social Networks, Neighborhood Effects, and Credit Access: Evidence from Rural Guatemala," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(6), pages 974-982, June.
    6. Durbach, Ian, 2009. "On the estimation of a satisficing model of choice using stochastic multicriteria acceptability analysis," Omega, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 497-509, June.
    7. Walker, Joan L. & Ehlers, Emily & Banerjee, Ipsita & Dugundji, Elenna R., 2011. "Correcting for endogeneity in behavioral choice models with social influence variables," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 45(4), pages 362-374, May.
    8. H. Spencer Banzhaf & V. Kerry Smith, 2007. "Meta-analysis in model implementation: choice sets and the valuation of air quality improvements," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(6), pages 1013-1031.
    9. Tiwari, Ashutosh & Richards, Timothy J., 2013. "Anonymous Social Networks versus Peer Networks in Restaurant Choice," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 150467, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    10. William A. Brock & Steven N. Durlauf, 2003. "Multinomial Choice with Social Interactions," NBER Technical Working Papers 0288, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Morrison, Geoffrey M. & Lin Lawell, C.-Y. Cynthia, 2016. "Driving in force: The influence of workplace peers on commuting decisions on U.S. military bases," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 125(C), pages 22-40.
    12. Andrew Grodner & Thomas Kniesner, 2005. "Labor Supply with Social Interactions: Econometric Estimates and Their Tax Policy Implications," Center for Policy Research Working Papers 69, Center for Policy Research, Maxwell School, Syracuse University.
    13. Grodner, Andrew & Kniesner, Thomas J. & Bishop, John A., 2011. "Social Interactions in the Labor Market," Foundations and Trends(R) in Microeconomics, now publishers, vol. 6(4), pages 265-366, September.
    14. Roger Bolton, 2006. "Habermas's Theory of Communicative Action and the Theory of Social Capital," Department of Economics Working Papers 2006-01, Department of Economics, Williams College.
    15. Ulrich Horst & Jan Wezelburger, 2006. "Non-ergodic Behavior in a Financial Market with Interacting Investors," 2006 Meeting Papers 229, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    16. Yannis M. Ioannides, 2010. "Neighborhood Effects and Housing," Discussion Papers Series, Department of Economics, Tufts University 0747, Department of Economics, Tufts University.
    17. Frank Goetzke & Tilmann Rave, 2015. "Automobile access, peer effects and happiness," Transportation, Springer, vol. 42(5), pages 791-805, September.
    18. Dorofeenko, Victor & Shorish, Jamsheed, 2005. "Partial differential equation modelling for stochastic fixed strategy distributed systems," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 29(1-2), pages 335-367, January.
    19. Alexandre Mas & Enrico Moretti, 2009. "Peers at Work," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(1), pages 112-145, March.
    20. Patrick Bayer & Fernando Ferreira & Robert McMillan, 2003. "A Unified Framework for Estimating Preferences for Schools and Neighborhoods," Working Papers 872, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
    21. Lugo, Maria Ana, 2011. "Heterogenous peer effects, segregation and academic attainment," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5718, The World Bank.
    22. Fukuda, Daisuke & Morichi, Shigeru, 2007. "Incorporating aggregate behavior in an individual's discrete choice: An application to analyzing illegal bicycle parking behavior," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 41(4), pages 313-325, May.
    23. Osvaldo Larrañaga Jiménez & Claudia Sanhueza Riveros, 2007. "Residential Segregation Effects on Poor’s Opportunities in Chile," Working Papers wp259, University of Chile, Department of Economics.
    24. Fleck, Robert K. & Hanssen, F. Andrew, 2013. "When voice fails: Potential exit as a constraint on government quality," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 26-41.
    25. Brock,W.A., 2003. "Tipping points, abrupt opinion changes, and punctuated policy change," Working papers 28, Wisconsin Madison - Social Systems.

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