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Trade, Growth, and Environmental Quality

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  • Sibel Sirakaya
  • Stephen Turnovsky
  • Nedim Alemdar

Abstract

This paper examines linkages between international trade, environmental degradation, and economic growth in a dynamic North-South trade game. Using a neoclassical production function subject to an endogenously improving technology, North produces manufactured goods by employing labor, capital, and a natural resource that it imports from South. South extracts the resource using raw labor, in the process generating local pollution. We study optimal regional policies in the presence of local pollution and technology spillovers from North to South under both non-cooperative and cooperative modes of trade. Non-cooperative trade is inefficient due to stock externalities. Cooperative trade policies are efficient and yet do not benefit North. Both regions gain from improved productivity in North and faster knowledge diffusion to South regardless of the trading regime. Copyright © 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
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Suggested Citation

  • Sibel Sirakaya & Stephen Turnovsky & Nedim Alemdar, "undated". "Trade, Growth, and Environmental Quality," Working Papers UWEC-2007-01-P, University of Washington, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:udb:wpaper:uwec-2007-01-p
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Chichilnisky, Graciela, 1994. "North-South Trade and the Global Environment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(4), pages 851-874, September.
    2. Frank Hettich, 2000. "Economic Growth and Environmental Policy," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 2086.
    3. Galor, Oded, 1986. "Global dynamic inefficiency in the absence of international policy coordination: A north-south case," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(1-2), pages 137-149, August.
    4. Amitrajeet A. Batabyal & Hamid Beladi, 2008. "A Stackelberg Game Model Of Trade In Renewable Resources With Competitive Sellers," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: Dynamic And Stochastic Approaches To The Environment And Economic Development, chapter 7, pages 103-121 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    5. Mercenier, Jean & Michel, Philippe, 1994. "Discrete-Time Finite Horizon Appromixation of Infinite Horizon Optimization Problems with Steady-State Invariance," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 62(3), pages 635-656, May.
    6. Lans Bovenberg, A. & Smulders, Sjak, 1995. "Environmental quality and pollution-augmenting technological change in a two-sector endogenous growth model," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(3), pages 369-391, July.
    7. Raymond Gradus & Sjak Smulders, 1993. "The trade-off between environmental care and long-term growth—Pollution in three prototype growth models," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 58(1), pages 25-51, February.
    8. Karp, Larry, 1984. "Optimality and consistency in a differential game with non-renewable resources," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 8(1), pages 73-97, October.
    9. Alemdar, Nedim M. & Ozyildirim, Suheyla, 1998. "A genetic game of trade, growth and externalities," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 22(6), pages 811-832, June.
    10. Clas Eriksson & Ficre Zehaie, 2005. "Population Density, Pollution and Growth," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 30(4), pages 465-484, April.
    11. Dockner Engelbert J. & Van Long Ngo, 1993. "International Pollution Control: Cooperative versus Noncooperative Strategies," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 13-29, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Stephen Devadoss & Jude Bayham, 2013. "US Ethanol Trade Policy: Pollution Reduction or Domestic Protection," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 21(3), pages 568-584, August.

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