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Modeling U.S. Historical Time-Series Prices and Inflation Using Various Linear and Nonlinear Long-Memory Approaches

Listed author(s):
  • Giorgio Canarella

    (University of Nevada, Las Vegas)

  • Luis A. Gil-Alaña

    (University of Navarra)

  • Rangan Gupta

    (University of Pretoria)

  • Stephen M. Miller

    (University of Nevada, Las Vegas)

This paper estimates the complete historical US price data by employing a relatively new statistical methodology based on long memory. We consider, in addition to the standard case, the possibility of nonlinearities in the form of nonlinear deterministic trends as well as the possibility that persistence exists at both the zero frequency and a frequencies away from zero. We model the fractional nonlinear case using Chebyshev polynomials and model the fractional cyclical structures as a Gegenbauer process. We find in the latter case that that secular (i.e., long-run) persistence and cyclical persistence matter in the behavior of prices, producing long-memory effects that imply mean reversion at both the long-run and cyclical frequencies.

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File URL: http://web2.uconn.edu/economics/working/2017-13.pdf
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Paper provided by University of Connecticut, Department of Economics in its series Working papers with number 2017-13.

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Length: 23 pages
Date of creation: Jun 2017
Handle: RePEc:uct:uconnp:2017-13
Note: Stephen Miller is the corresponding author
Contact details of provider: Postal:
University of Connecticut 365 Fairfield Way, Unit 1063 Storrs, CT 06269-1063

Phone: (860) 486-4889
Fax: (860) 486-4463
Web page: http://www.econ.uconn.edu/

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  1. Guglielmo Maria Caporale & Luis A. Gil-Alana, 2007. "Nonlinearities and Fractional Integration in the US Unemployment Rate," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 69(4), pages 521-544, 08.
  2. Caporale, Guglielmo Maria & Gil-Alana, Luis A., 2002. "Fractional integration and mean reversion in stock prices," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 599-609.
  3. Violetta Dalla & Javier Hidalgo, 2005. "A Parametric Bootstrap Test for Cycles," STICERD - Econometrics Paper Series 486, Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines, LSE.
  4. Granger, C. W. J., 1980. "Long memory relationships and the aggregation of dynamic models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 14(2), pages 227-238, October.
  5. repec:bpj:sndecm:v:21:y:2017:i:4:p:18:n:6 is not listed on IDEAS
  6. repec:eme:jespps:jes-10-2015-0190 is not listed on IDEAS
  7. Dalla, Violetta & Hidalgo, Javier, 2005. "A parametric bootstrap test for cycles," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 6829, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  8. Kydland, Finn E & Prescott, Edward C, 1982. "Time to Build and Aggregate Fluctuations," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(6), pages 1345-1370, November.
  9. Heni Boubaker & Giorgio Canarella & Rangan Gupta & Stephen M. Miller, 2016. "Time-Varying Persistence of Inflation: Evidence from a Wavelet-Based Approach," Working Papers 201647, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
  10. Granger, C. W. J., 1981. "Some properties of time series data and their use in econometric model specification," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 16(1), pages 121-130, May.
  11. Gil-Alana, Luis A. & Gupta, Rangan, 2014. "Persistence and cycles in historical oil price data," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 511-516.
  12. Arthur F. Burns & Wesley C. Mitchell, 1946. "Measuring Business Cycles," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number burn46-1, November.
  13. Caporale, Guglielmo Maria & Gil-Alana, Luis A., 2013. "Long memory and fractional integration in high frequency data on the US dollar/British pound spot exchange rate," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 1-9.
  14. Mankiw, N Gregory, 1989. "Real Business Cycles: A New Keynesian Perspective," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 3(3), pages 79-90, Summer.
  15. Giorgio Canarella & Stephen Miller, 2016. "Inflation persistence and structural breaks: the experience of inflation targeting countries and the US," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 43(6), pages 980-1005, November.
  16. Long, John B, Jr & Plosser, Charles I, 1983. "Real Business Cycles," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 91(1), pages 39-69, February.
  17. Giorgio Canarella & Stephen M Miller, 2017. "Inflation Persistence Before and After Inflation Targeting: A Fractional Integration Approach," Eastern Economic Journal, Palgrave Macmillan;Eastern Economic Association, vol. 43(1), pages 78-103, January.
  18. Dalla, Violetta & Hidalgo, Javier, 2005. "A parametric bootstrap test for cycles," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 129(1-2), pages 219-261.
  19. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1972. "Expectations and the neutrality of money," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 4(2), pages 103-124, April.
  20. Giorgio Canarella & Stephen M. Miller, 2016. "Inflation Targeting: New Evidence from Fractional Integration and Cointegration," Working papers 2016-08, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
  21. Jeffrey C. Fuhrer, 1995. "The persistence of inflation and the cost of disinflation," New England Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Jan, pages 3-16.
  22. Demetrescu, Matei & Kuzin, Vladimir & Hassler, Uwe, 2008. "Long Memory Testing In The Time Domain," Econometric Theory, Cambridge University Press, vol. 24(01), pages 176-215, February.
  23. Lucas, Robert E, Jr, 1975. "An Equilibrium Model of the Business Cycle," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 83(6), pages 1113-1144, December.
  24. Manmohan S. Kumar & Tatsuyoshi Okimoto, 2007. "Dynamics of Persistence in International Inflation Rates," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 39(6), pages 1457-1479, 09.
  25. Nelson, Charles R. & Plosser, Charles I., 1982. "Trends and random walks in macroeconmic time series : Some evidence and implications," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(2), pages 139-162.
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