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Conversations between Anthropologists and Economists

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  • Metin Cosgel

    (University of Connecticut)

Abstract

Interdisciplinary citation patterns and other indicators of the flow and sharing of academic knowledge suggest that economists and anthropologists do not talk to each other. Previous studies of this puzzling trend have typically attributed the problem to methodological differences between the two disciplines. Although there are significant differences between economics and anthropology in behavioral assumptions and modes of inquiry, similar differences exist between them and other disciplines (some with much heavier volumes of cross-citations with economics or anthropology), suggesting that the source of the problem lies elsewhere. This paper considers the problem at a deeper level by examining systematic differences in the preferences, capabilities, and literary cultures of economists and anthropologists. Adopting a rhetorical perspective, I consider not the firms, households, or tribes as the principal objective of analysis in the two disciplines, but the conversations between these units. These conversations (through non-verbal as well as verbal media) can be grouped into two genres, based on the type of problem they aim to solve. Those in the first genre aim to solve the problem of interest--how to align the incentives of the parties involved. Those in the second genre deal with the problem of knowledge--how to align localized, and dispersed information. Economists are interested and capable of dealing with primarily, if not exclusively, the first genre, and anthropologists focus on the second. This difference has far reaching consequences for how economists and anthropologists conduct their own scholarly conversations with their own colleagues, why they are having difficulty talking to each other across disciplinary boundaries, and what can be done to change the patterns of communication.

Suggested Citation

  • Metin Cosgel, 2005. "Conversations between Anthropologists and Economists," Working papers 2005-29, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:uct:uconnp:2005-29
    Note: For presentation at the 4th International Rhetoric Culture Conference Johannes Gutenberg-University, Mainz, July, 16-20, 2005
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    File URL: http://web2.uconn.edu/economics/working/2005-29.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:mes:jeciss:v:16:y:1982:i:2:p:485-487 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Langlois, Richard N & Foss, Nicolai J, 1999. "Capabilities and Governance: The Rebirth of Production in the Theory of Economic Organization," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(2), pages 201-218.
    3. Cosgel, Metin M. & Minkler, Lanse, 2004. "Rationality, integrity, and religious behavior," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 329-341, July.
    4. M.CoĊŸgel, Metin, 1994. "Audience Effects In Consumption," Economics and Philosophy, Cambridge University Press, vol. 10(01), pages 19-30, April.
    5. Farrell, Joseph, 1995. "Talk Is Cheap," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(2), pages 186-190, May.
    6. repec:mes:jeciss:v:34:y:2000:i:4:p:771-788 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. McCloskey, Donald & Klamer, Arjo, 1995. "One Quarter of GDP Is Persuasion," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(2), pages 191-195, May.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    anthropology; conversation; interest; incentive; knowledge;

    JEL classification:

    • A12 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Relation of Economics to Other Disciplines
    • B4 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Economic Methodology
    • O5 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies
    • Z1 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics

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