IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/uct/uconnp/2005-29.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Conversations between Anthropologists and Economists

Author

Listed:
  • Metin Cosgel

    (University of Connecticut)

Abstract

Interdisciplinary citation patterns and other indicators of the flow and sharing of academic knowledge suggest that economists and anthropologists do not talk to each other. Previous studies of this puzzling trend have typically attributed the problem to methodological differences between the two disciplines. Although there are significant differences between economics and anthropology in behavioral assumptions and modes of inquiry, similar differences exist between them and other disciplines (some with much heavier volumes of cross-citations with economics or anthropology), suggesting that the source of the problem lies elsewhere. This paper considers the problem at a deeper level by examining systematic differences in the preferences, capabilities, and literary cultures of economists and anthropologists. Adopting a rhetorical perspective, I consider not the firms, households, or tribes as the principal objective of analysis in the two disciplines, but the conversations between these units. These conversations (through non-verbal as well as verbal media) can be grouped into two genres, based on the type of problem they aim to solve. Those in the first genre aim to solve the problem of interest--how to align the incentives of the parties involved. Those in the second genre deal with the problem of knowledge--how to align localized, and dispersed information. Economists are interested and capable of dealing with primarily, if not exclusively, the first genre, and anthropologists focus on the second. This difference has far reaching consequences for how economists and anthropologists conduct their own scholarly conversations with their own colleagues, why they are having difficulty talking to each other across disciplinary boundaries, and what can be done to change the patterns of communication.

Suggested Citation

  • Metin Cosgel, 2005. "Conversations between Anthropologists and Economists," Working papers 2005-29, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:uct:uconnp:2005-29
    Note: For presentation at the 4th International Rhetoric Culture Conference Johannes Gutenberg-University, Mainz, July, 16-20, 2005
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://media.economics.uconn.edu/working/2005-29.pdf
    File Function: Full text
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Sidney M. Greenfield, 1982. "Anthropology and Institutional Economics," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(2), pages 485-487, June.
    2. Richard N. Langlois & Nicolai J. Foss, 1999. "Capabilities and Governance: The Rebirth of Production in the Theory of Economic Organization," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(2), pages 201-218, May.
    3. Cosgel, Metin M. & Minkler, Lanse, 2004. "Rationality, integrity, and religious behavior," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 329-341, July.
    4. M.CoÅŸgel, Metin, 1994. "Audience Effects In Consumption," Economics and Philosophy, Cambridge University Press, vol. 10(1), pages 19-30, April.
    5. Farrell, Joseph, 1995. "Talk Is Cheap," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(2), pages 186-190, May.
    6. Michael S. Billig, 2000. "Institutions and Culture: Neo-Weberian Economic Anthropology," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(4), pages 771-788, December.
    7. McCloskey, Donald & Klamer, Arjo, 1995. "One Quarter of GDP Is Persuasion," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(2), pages 191-195, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Metin M. Cosgel, 2008. "The Socio-economics of Consumption: Solutions to the Problems of Interest, Knowledge and Identity," Chapters, in: John B. Davis & Wilfred Dolfsma (ed.), The Elgar Companion to Social Economics, chapter 8, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Roberta Capello & Andrea Caragliu & Peter Nijkamp, 2009. "Territorial Capital and Regional Growth: Increasing Returns in Cognitive Knowledge Use," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 09-059/3, Tinbergen Institute.
    3. Oliveira, Livio Luiz Soares de, 2013. "A teoria econômica da religião: aspectos gerais [Economics of religion: general aspects]," MPRA Paper 52012, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Jackie Krafft, 2006. "Business history and the organization of industry," Post-Print hal-00211780, HAL.
    5. Niklas Elert & Magnus Henrekson, 2019. "The collaborative innovation bloc: A new mission for Austrian economics," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 32(4), pages 295-320, December.
    6. Feltovich, Nick & Grossman, Philip J., 2015. "How does the effect of pre-play suggestions vary with group size? Experimental evidence from a threshold public-good game," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 79(C), pages 263-280.
    7. Andrew A. King & Christopher L. Tucci, 2002. "Incumbent Entry into New Market Niches: The Role of Experience and Managerial Choice in the Creation of Dynamic Capabilities," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 48(2), pages 171-186, February.
    8. Tony Yu, 2001. "An Entrepreneurial Perspective of Institutional Change," Constitutional Political Economy, Springer, vol. 12(3), pages 217-236, September.
    9. Albuquerque, Paula C., 2003. "The Traditional Brokers: What are their Chances in the Forex?," Journal of Applied Economics, Universidad del CEMA, vol. 6(2), pages 1-16, November.
    10. SIRGHI Nicoleta, 2014. "Evolutionary Theory And The Market Competition," Annals of Faculty of Economics, University of Oradea, Faculty of Economics, vol. 1(2), pages 218-224, December.
    11. Sendhil Mullainathan & Joshua Schwartzstein & Andrei Shleifer, 2008. "Coarse Thinking and Persuasion," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 123(2), pages 577-619.
    12. Raspe, Otto & van Oort, Frank, 2008. "Firm Growth and Localized Knowledge Externalities," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 38(2), pages 1-17.
    13. Wolfgang Kerber & Simonetta Vezzoso, 2004. "EU Competition Policy, Vertical Restraints, and Innovation: An Analysis from an Evolutionary Perspective," Marburg Working Papers on Economics 200414, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).
    14. Petersen, Verner C., 2005. "The otherworldly view of economics - and its consequences," Working Papers 2005-13, University of Aarhus, Aarhus School of Business, Department of Management.
    15. Emir Kamenica & Matthew Gentzkow, 2011. "Bayesian Persuasion," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(6), pages 2590-2615, October.
    16. Davide Consoli, 2005. "Cash and the Counter: Capabilities and Preferences in the Demand for Banking Technologies," Industrial Organization 0511001, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    17. Ugo Rizzo & Francesco Nicolli & Laura Ramaciotti, 2014. "The Heterogeneity of the Development Process of New Technology-Based Firms. Implication for Innovation Policies," Journal of the Knowledge Economy, Springer;Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology (PICMET), vol. 5(1), pages 114-132, March.
    18. Otto H. Swank & Phongthorn Wrasai, 2002. "Deliberation, Information Aggregation and Collective Decision Making," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 02-006/1, Tinbergen Institute, revised 03 Dec 2002.
    19. Albert N. Link & Christopher J. Ruhm, 2013. "Public knowledge, private knowledge: the intellectual capital of entrepreneurs," Chapters, in: Public Support of Innovation in Entrepreneurial Firms, chapter 7, pages 113-126, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    20. Alok R. Saboo & Rajdeep Grewal, 2013. "Stock Market Reactions to Customer and Competitor Orientations: The Case of Initial Public Offerings," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 32(1), pages 70-88, October.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    anthropology; conversation; interest; incentive; knowledge;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • A12 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Relation of Economics to Other Disciplines
    • B4 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Economic Methodology
    • O5 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies
    • Z1 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:uct:uconnp:2005-29. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/deuctus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Mark McConnel (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/deuctus.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.