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The Socio-economics of Consumption: Solutions to the Problems of Interest, Knowledge and Identity

In: The Elgar Companion to Social Economics

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  • Metin M. Cosgel

Abstract

As this comprehensive Companion demonstrates, social economics is a dynamic and growing field that emphasizes the key role that values play in the economy and in economic life. Social economics treats the economy and economics as being embedded in the larger web of social and ethical relationships. It also regards economics and ethics as essentially connected, and adds values such as justice, fairness, dignity, well-being, freedom and equality to the standard emphasis on efficiency. The Elgar Companion to Social Economics brings together the leading contributors in the field to elucidate a wide range of recent developments across different subject areas and topics. In so doing the contributors also map the likely trends and directions of future research. This Companion will undoubtedly become a leading reference source and guide to social economics for many years to come.

Suggested Citation

  • Metin M. Cosgel, 2008. "The Socio-economics of Consumption: Solutions to the Problems of Interest, Knowledge and Identity," Chapters, in: John B. Davis & Wilfred Dolfsma (ed.), The Elgar Companion to Social Economics, chapter 8, Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:3765_8
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Elias Khalil, 2004. "The Gift Paradox: Complex Selves and Symbolic Good," Review of Social Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 62(3), pages 379-392.
    2. Thaler, Richard H & Shefrin, H M, 1981. "An Economic Theory of Self-Control," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 89(2), pages 392-406, April.
    3. George A. Akerlof & Rachel E. Kranton, 2002. "Identity and Schooling: Some Lessons for the Economics of Education," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 40(4), pages 1167-1201, December.
    4. John C. Harsanyi, 1955. "Cardinal Welfare, Individualistic Ethics, and Interpersonal Comparisons of Utility," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 63, pages 309-309.
    5. Cosgel, Metin M. & Minkler, Lanse, 2004. "Rationality, integrity, and religious behavior," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 329-341, July.
    6. M.CoÅŸgel, Metin, 1994. "Audience Effects In Consumption," Economics and Philosophy, Cambridge University Press, vol. 10(1), pages 19-30, April.
    7. Stigler, George J & Becker, Gary S, 1977. "De Gustibus Non Est Disputandum," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 67(2), pages 76-90, March.
    8. McCloskey, Donald & Klamer, Arjo, 1995. "One Quarter of GDP Is Persuasion," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(2), pages 191-195, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Joshua Frank, 2007. "Meat as a bad habit: A case for positive feedback in consumption preferences leading to lock-in," Review of Social Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 65(3), pages 319-348.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economics and Finance; Social Policy and Sociology;

    JEL classification:

    • A12 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Relation of Economics to Other Disciplines
    • A13 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Relation of Economics to Social Values
    • A14 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Sociology of Economics
    • D1 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior
    • D8 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty

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