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Handedness and depression : evidence from a large population survey

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  • Kevin Denny

Abstract

This paper uses a new large population survey from twelve European countries to measure the association between handedness and depression. It is found that that depressive symptoms are significantly higher amongst left-handed men. While 19% of right handed men report experiencing depressive symptoms for at least a two week period, the figure for left handed men is almost 25%. For women the corresponding percentages are 33% and 36% respectively but the difference is not statistically significant. Using the EURO-D depression scale gives equivalent results. These results are consistent with one finding from an existing small scale study.

Suggested Citation

  • Kevin Denny, 2008. "Handedness and depression : evidence from a large population survey," Working Papers 200814, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucn:wpaper:200814
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10197/968
    File Function: First version, 2008
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Tamás Bartus, 2005. "Estimation of marginal effects using margeff," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 5(3), pages 309-329, September.
    2. Kevin Denny, 2008. "Cognitive ability and continuous measures of relative hand-skill. a note," Working Papers 200805, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
    3. Kevin Denny & Vincent O'Sullivan, 2004. "The economic consequences of being left-handed : some sinister results (version 2.0)," Working Papers 200422, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
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    Cited by:

    1. Denny, Kevin J., 2011. "Instrumental variable estimation of the effect of prayer on depression," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 73(8), pages 1194-1199.
    2. Johnston, David W. & Nicholls, Michael E. R. & Shah, Manisha & Shields, Michael A., 2010. "Handedness, Health and Cognitive Development: Evidence from Children in the NLSY," IZA Discussion Papers 4774, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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    Keywords

    Left- and right-handedness--Psychological aspects; Depression; Mental;

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