IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/uam/wpaper/200807.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Maternity and working life: reconsidering the effectiveness of part-time employment

Author

Listed:
  • Blázquez, Maite

    () (Departamento de Análisis Económico (Teoría e Historia Económica). Universidad Autónoma de Madrid.)

  • Moral Carcedo, Julian

    () (Departamento de Análisis Económico (Teoría e Historia Económica). Universidad Autónoma de Madrid)

Abstract

The way in which professional and familiar life are reconciled might have important economic consequences both at individual and aggregate level. While as a flexible form of employment, part-time work may serve to reconcile professional and family life and increase female participation in the labour market, it can also give rise to new forms of inequality, thereby undermining the equal opportunities objectives established by the EU social policy. Creating substantive equality between part- and full-time workers and achieving gender neutrality means, above all, to ensure that those workers who combine part-time work with child care responsibilities do not suffer detrimental consequences in their career prospects. Although several actions at European Community level have been undertaken in the last decade to achieve greater equality between part- and full-timers, there is still evidence of a close relationship between atypical work, forms of parental leave, and gender discrimination in the labour relations of Members States. In this respect, many academic works have convincingly demonstrated how part-time workers are very often at a disadvantage when compared to their full-time counterparts. One disadvantage not explored yet in the current literature is the higher probability of transition into non-employment amongst part-timers. In this paper, we focus on the effects that the existence of differences in these transition rates between part- and full-timers, and the subsequent persistence of non-employment episodes, have on female career prospects. We present a theoretical model that incorporates those differences in unemployment risk and that serves us to conclude that, when part-timers experience higher probabilities of exiting the labour market, this form of employment becomes less attractive for women with child care responsibilities. This might serve to explain why in some countries full-time employment is the preferred option for mothers who want to remain in the labour market.

Suggested Citation

  • Blázquez, Maite & Moral Carcedo, Julian, 2008. "Maternity and working life: reconsidering the effectiveness of part-time employment," Working Papers in Economic Theory 2008/07, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (Spain), Department of Economic Analysis (Economic Theory and Economic History).
  • Handle: RePEc:uam:wpaper:200807
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.uam.es/departamentos/economicas/analecon/especifica/mimeo/wp20087.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Evelyn Lehrer & Seiichi Kawasaki, 1985. "Child care arrangements and fertility: An analysis of two-earner households," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 22(4), pages 499-513, November.
    2. Daniela Del Boca, 2002. "The effect of child care and part time opportunities on participation and fertility decisions in Italy," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 15(3), pages 549-573.
    3. Ribar, David C, 1995. "A Structural Model of Child Care and the Labor Supply of Married Women," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 13(3), pages 558-597, July.
    4. Robert Shimer, 2005. "The Assignment of Workers to Jobs in an Economy with Coordination Frictions," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 113(5), pages 996-1025, October.
    5. Gunderson, Morley, 1989. "Male-Female Wage Differentials and Policy Responses," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 27(1), pages 46-72, March.
    6. Mary Gregory & Sara Connolly, 2008. "Feature: The Price of Reconciliation: Part-Time Work, Families and Women's Satisfaction," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 118(526), pages 1-7, February.
    7. John F. Ermisch & Robert E. Wright, 1993. "Wage Offers and Full-Time and Part-Time Employment by British Women," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 28(1), pages 111-133.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Moral Carcedo, Julian & García Belenguer-Campos, Fernando & Bote Álvarez-Carrasco, Valentín, 2012. "Flexibilidad del tiempo de trabajo en España: ¿Ha alterado la crisis el comportamiento del empleo a tiempo parcial?/Work Time Flexibility in Spain: Changes in the Characteristics of Part Time Employme," Estudios de Economía Aplicada, Estudios de Economía Aplicada, vol. 30, pages 209-236, Abril.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Childcare; Part time employment;

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:uam:wpaper:200807. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Andrés Maroto-Sánchez). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/dauames.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.