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Unequal Opportunities and Distributive Justice

  • Urs Fischbacher
  • Gerald Eisenkopf
  • Franziska F�llmi-Heusi

There is well established empirical evidence that more redistribution occurs when luck rather than performance determines the earnings. We provide experimental evidence on how unequal access to performance enhancing education affects demand for redistribution. In this experiment, we can control the information about the role of luck and effort. We find that unequal opportunities evoke a preference for redistribution that is comparable to the situation when luck alone determines the allocation rather than performance. Furthermore, unequal opportunities reduce performance incentives.

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Paper provided by Thurgauer Wirtschaftsinstitut, Universit�t Konstanz in its series TWI Research Paper Series with number 57.

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Date of creation: 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:twi:respas:0057
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