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Effects of internal migration on labour market behaviour of families left-behind in Vietnam

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  • David Granada Donato

Abstract

This document explores the implications of a migratory shock (in the form of household member(s) leaving) on the labour market behaviour of individuals left-behind in Vietnam. In addition, various coping mechanisms exhibited by each age group and their implications regarding sectoral labour allocation are further explored. Using panel data of 2,200 households in six waves and a DiD specification, the results suggest an increase in the likelihood of working for the elderly in agriculture that is most likely associated with higher labour invested in livestock activities. The results are robust to different specifications. Moreover, this coping mechanism of increased work is exhibited by those families that do not receive remittances and seems to last (even increase) for up to three periods after the migratory shock occurs. Interestingly, there is also evidence of diminishing returns on working probability when the share of migrants in the household increase.

Suggested Citation

  • David Granada Donato, 2022. "Effects of internal migration on labour market behaviour of families left-behind in Vietnam," TVSEP Working Papers wp-023, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Institute of Development and Agricultural Economics, Project TVSEP.
  • Handle: RePEc:tvs:wpaper:wp-023
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    File URL: http://wp-tvsep.ifgb.uni-hannover.de/RePEc/tvs/pdfbib/wp-023.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. de Janvry, Alain & Fafchamps, M. & Sadoulet, Elisabeth, 1991. "Peasant Household Behavior with Missing Markets: Some Paradoxes Explain," CUDARE Working Papers 198579, University of California, Berkeley, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
    2. Wouterse, Fleur & Taylor, J. Edward, 2008. "Migration and Income Diversification:: Evidence from Burkina Faso," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(4), pages 625-640, April.
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    4. de Janvry, Alain & Fafchamps, Marcel & Sadoulet, Elisabeth, 1991. "Peasant Household Behaviour with Missing Markets: Some Paradoxes Explained," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 101(409), pages 1400-1417, November.
    5. J. Taylor & T.J. Wyatt, 1996. "The shadow value of migrant remittances, income and inequality in a householdā€farm economy," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(6), pages 899-912.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Migration; Left-Behind; Labour Market; Agriculture;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • P25 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Urban, Rural, and Regional Economics
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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