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When the Mob Goes Silent: Uncovering the Effects of Racial Harassment through a Natural Experiment

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  • Mauro Caselli
  • Paolo Falco

Abstract

How does harassment impact the performance of discriminated minorities? Using a natural experiment induced by the COVID-19 pandemic, we test how the sudden absence of supporters at football games impacts the performance of players from minority groups in Italy. We find that players from Africa, who are most commonly targeted by racial harassment, experience a significant improvement in performance when supporters are no longer at the stadium. Using data on o

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  • Mauro Caselli & Paolo Falco, 2021. "When the Mob Goes Silent: Uncovering the Effects of Racial Harassment through a Natural Experiment," DEM Working Papers 2021/01, Department of Economics and Management.
  • Handle: RePEc:trn:utwprg:2021/01
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