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Transition of Spatial Distribution of Human Capital in Japan

Author

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  • Yasuhiro Sato

    (Faculty of Economics, The University of Tokyo)

  • Masaaki Toma

    ( Graduate School of Economics, Osaka University)

Abstract

We examine the transition of the spatial distribution of human capital by using data on Japanese prefectures. We find substantive concentration of university enrollments in Tokyo and its neighboring prefectures. After graduation, slight dispersal occurs but the movements are limited to neighboring prefectures. Moreover, we examine the relationship between human capital distributions of different cohorts, and find that the concentration of university graduates of a particular age group attracts university graduates of adjacent age groups. However, such an effect becomes insignificant and sometimes opposite as the age differences grow.

Suggested Citation

  • Yasuhiro Sato & Masaaki Toma, 2017. "Transition of Spatial Distribution of Human Capital in Japan," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-1046, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.
  • Handle: RePEc:tky:fseres:2017cf1046
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    File URL: http://www.cirje.e.u-tokyo.ac.jp/research/dp/2017/2017cf1046.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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