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Overreporting vs. Overreacting: Commuters' Perceptions of Travel Times

Author

Listed:
  • Stefanie Peer

    (VU University Amsterdam, and Institute for the Environment and Regional Development, Vienna University of Economics and Business, Austria)

  • Jasper Knockaert

    (VU University Amsterdam)

  • Paul Koster

    (VU University Amsterdam)

  • Erik Verhoef

    (VU University Amsterdam)

Abstract

We asked participants of a large-scale, real-life peak avoidance experiment to provide estimates of their average in-vehicle travel time for their morning commute. Comparing these reported travel times to the corresponding actual travel times, we find that travel times are overstated by a factor of 1.5 on average. We show that driver- and link-speci c characteristics partially explain the overstating. Using stated and revealed preference data, we investigate whether the driverspecific reporting errors are consistent with the drivers' scheduling behavior in reality as well as in hypothetical choice experiments. For neither case, we find robust evidence that drivers behave as if they misperceived travel times to a similar extent as they misreported them, implying that reported travel times do neither represent actual nor perceived travel times truthfully. The results presented in this paper are thus a strong caveat against the uncritical use of reported travel time data in transport research and policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Stefanie Peer & Jasper Knockaert & Paul Koster & Erik Verhoef, 2013. "Overreporting vs. Overreacting: Commuters' Perceptions of Travel Times," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 13-123/VIII, Tinbergen Institute, revised 25 Aug 2013.
  • Handle: RePEc:tin:wpaper:20130123
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Koster, Paul R. & Koster, Hans R.A., 2015. "Commuters’ preferences for fast and reliable travel: A semi-parametric estimation approach," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 81(P1), pages 289-301.
    2. repec:eee:jotrge:v:68:y:2018:i:c:p:78-93 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Jasper Knockaert & Stefanie Peer & Erik Verhoef, 2016. "Identification of self-selection biases in field experiments using stated preference experiments," Natural Field Experiments 00568, The Field Experiments Website.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    travel time perception; reported travel times; valuation of travel time; departure time choices; peak avoidance experiment; panel latent class models; revealed preference (RP) data;

    JEL classification:

    • C25 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions; Probabilities
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • D84 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Expectations; Speculations
    • R41 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - Transportation: Demand, Supply, and Congestion; Travel Time; Safety and Accidents; Transportation Noise

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