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The Spatial Distribution of Labour Force Participation & Market Earnings at the Sub-National Level in Ireland


  • Karyn Morrissey

    (Rural Economy and Development Programme, Teagasc, Athenry, Co. Galway, Ireland)

  • Cathal O’Donoghue

    () (Rural Economy and Development Programme, Teagasc, Athenry, Co. Galway, Ireland)


The main aim of this paper is to provide a spatial modelling framework for labour force participation and income estimation. The development of a household income distribution for Ireland had previously been hampered by the lack of disaggregated data on individual earnings. Spatial microsimulation through a process of calibration provides a method which allows one to recreate the spatial distribution LFP and household market income at the small area level. Further analysis examines the relationship between LFP, occupational type and market income at the small area level in Co. Galway Ireland.

Suggested Citation

  • Karyn Morrissey & Cathal O’Donoghue, 2009. "The Spatial Distribution of Labour Force Participation & Market Earnings at the Sub-National Level in Ireland," Working Papers 0912, Rural Economy and Development Programme,Teagasc.
  • Handle: RePEc:tea:wpaper:0912

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Fran??ois Bourguignon & Francisco H. G. Ferreira & Phillippe G. Leite, 2002. "Beyond Oaxaca-Blinder: Accounting for Differences in Household Income Distributions Across Countries," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 478, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    2. Carlos R. Azzoni, 2001. "Economic growth and regional income inequality in Brazil," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 35(1), pages 133-152.
    3. Juhn, Chinhui & Murphy, Kevin M & Pierce, Brooks, 1993. "Wage Inequality and the Rise in Returns to Skill," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(3), pages 410-442, June.
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