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The long walk: Considering the enduring spatial and racial dimensions of deprivation two decades after the fall of apartheid

Listed author(s):
  • Ronelle Burger

    ()

    (Department of Economics, University of Stellenbosch)

  • Servaas van der Berg

    ()

    (Department of Economics, University of Stellenbosch)

  • Sarel van der Walt

    ()

    (Department of Economics, University of Stellenbosch)

  • Derek Yu

    ()

    (Department of Economics, University of Stellenbosch)

This study examines the enduring spatial and racial dimensions of poverty and deprivation in South Africa to assess the progress made by the post-apartheid society and state. A multi-dimensional approach is required to assess progress because it can reflect the reduction in deprivation attributable to the improved affordability and expanded coverage of government services. While there has been previous studies tracking poverty trends over segments of the post-apartheid period, no previous work has considered multi-dimensional deprivation over the two decades following the official fall of apartheid. We adopt the Total Fuzzy and Relative approach proposed by Cheli and Lemmi (1995) to derive a poverty index with nine dimensions of deprivation, including education, employment, dwelling type, overcrowding, access to electricity, water, telephone, sanitation and refuse collection. Our analysis shows that there has been a significant improvement in deprivation levels between 1996 and 2011, but it also finds that geography and race continue to play an important role in explaining patterns of deprivation.

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File URL: https://www.ekon.sun.ac.za/wpapers/2015/wp172015/wp-17-2015.pdf
File Function: First version, 2015
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Paper provided by Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 17/2015.

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Date of creation: 2015
Handle: RePEc:sza:wpaper:wpapers250
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  1. Mozaffar Qizilbash, 2002. "A note on the measurement of poverty and vulnerability in the South African context," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(6), pages 757-772.
  2. Michael Noble & Gemma Wright, 2013. "Using Indicators of Multiple Deprivation to Demonstrate the Spatial Legacy of Apartheid in South Africa," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 112(1), pages 187-201, May.
  3. Sabina Alkire & James Foster, 2011. "Understandings and misunderstandings of multidimensional poverty measurement," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 9(2), pages 289-314, June.
  4. Ravallion, Martin, 1996. "Issues in Measuring and Modelling Poverty," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 106(438), pages 1328-1343, September.
  5. Klasen, Stephan, 2000. "Measuring Poverty and Deprivation in South Africa," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 46(1), pages 33-58, March.
  6. Marisa Coetzee, 2013. "Finding the Benefits: Estimating the Impact of The South African Child Support Grant," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 81(3), pages 427-450, 09.
  7. Murray Leibbrandt & Laura Poswell & Pranushka & Matthew Welch & Ingrid Woolard, 2004. "Measuring recent changes in South African inequality and poverty using 1996 and 2001 census data," SALDRU/CSSR Working Papers 084, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
  8. Servaas van der Berg & Eldridge Moses, 2012. "How better targeting of social spending affects social delivery in South Africa," Development Southern Africa, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(1), pages 127-139, March.
  9. Servaas Van der berg & Megan Louw & Derek Yu, 2008. "Post-Transition Poverty Trends Based On An Alternative Data Source," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 76(1), pages 58-76, 03.
  10. Servaas van der Berg & Cobus Burger & Ronelle Burger & Mia de Vos & Gideon du Rand & Martin Gustafsson & Eldridge Moses & Debra Shepherd & Nicholas Spaull & Stephen Taylor & Hendrik van Broekhuizen & , 2011. "Low quality education as a poverty trap," Working Papers 25/2011, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
  11. Mozaffar Qizilbash & David Clark, 2005. "The Capability Approach and Fuzzy Poverty Measures: An Application to the South African Context," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 74(1), pages 103-139, October.
  12. Servaas van der Berg, 2014. "Inequality, poverty and prospects for redistribution," Development Southern Africa, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(2), pages 197-218, March.
  13. Arden Finn & Murray Leibbrandt & Ingrid Woolard, 2013. "What happened to multidimensional poverty in South Africa between 1993 and 2010?," SALDRU Working Papers 099, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
  14. Murray Leibbrandt & Ingrid Woolard & Arden Finn & Jonathan Argent, 2010. "Trends in South African Income Distribution and Poverty since the Fall of Apartheid," OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers 101, OECD Publishing.
  15. Stephan Klasen, 1997. "Poverty, Inequality and Deprivation in South Africa: An Analysis of the 1993 SALDRU Survey," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 41(1), pages 51-94, July.
  16. David A Clark & Mozaffar Qizilbash, 2008. "Core Poverty, Vagueness and Adaptation: A New Methodology and Some Results for South Africa," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(4), pages 519-544, April.
  17. Haroon Bhorat & Carlene van der Westhuizen, 2013. "Non-monetary dimensions of well-being in South Africa, 1993--2004: A post-apartheid dividend?," Development Southern Africa, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(3), pages 295-314, September.
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