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Endogenous Labor Force Participation, Involuntary Unemployment and Monetary Policy

Listed author(s):
  • Yuelin Liu

    ()

    (School of Economics, Australian School of Business, the University of New South Wales)

This paper develops a New Keynesian model with search frictions in which generated frictional unemployment is consistent with the time series of involuntary unemployment collected by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Thus, it can shed light on the relevant impact of labor market frictions and policy interventions on the observed unemployment about which policy makers and the public are concerned. The data-consistent unemployment is achieved in the model via introduction of partial consumption insurance and an endogenous labor force participation channel. In particular, I find that allowing for endogenous labor force participation greatly improves the model fit for U.S. data. It appears that the price markup shock and matching efficiency shock are the two key driving forces of unemployment fluctuations. Monetary policy that stabilizes the participation gap can be welfare improving.

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File URL: http://research.economics.unsw.edu.au/RePEc/papers/2014-41.pdf
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Paper provided by School of Economics, The University of New South Wales in its series Discussion Papers with number 2014-41.

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Length: 43 pages
Date of creation: Dec 2014
Handle: RePEc:swe:wpaper:2014-41
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  1. Jordi Galí & Thijs van Rens, 2008. "The vanishing procyclicality of labor productivity," Economics Working Papers 1230, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Jul 2010.
  2. Krause, Michael U. & Lopez-Salido, David & Lubik, Thomas A., 2008. "Inflation dynamics with search frictions: A structural econometric analysis," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(5), pages 892-916, July.
  3. Mark Gertler & Luca Sala & Antonella Trigari, 2008. "An Estimated Monetary DSGE Model with Unemployment and Staggered Nominal Wage Bargaining," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 40(8), pages 1713-1764, December.
  4. Krause, Michael U. & Lubik, Thomas A., 2007. "The (ir)relevance of real wage rigidity in the New Keynesian model with search frictions," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(3), pages 706-727, April.
  5. Christoffel, Kai & Kuester, Keith & Linzert, Tobias, 2009. "The role of labor markets for euro area monetary policy," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 53(8), pages 908-936, November.
  6. Diamond, Peter A, 1982. "Aggregate Demand Management in Search Equilibrium," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 90(5), pages 881-894, October.
  7. Pascal Michaillat, 2012. "Do Matching Frictions Explain Unemployment? Not in Bad Times," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(4), pages 1721-1750, June.
  8. Campolmi, Alessia & Gnocchi, Stefano, 2016. "Labor market participation, unemployment and monetary policy," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 79(C), pages 17-29.
  9. Francesco Furlanetto & Nicolas Groshenny, 2012. "Matching efficiency and business cycle fluctuations," Working Paper 2012/07, Norges Bank.
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