IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Econometric estimation of Armington import elasticities for regional CGE models of the Chicago and Illinois economies

  • Soo Jung Ha

    ()

    (Department of Economics, University of Strathclyde)

  • Geoffrey Hewings

    ()

    (Regional Economics Applications Laboratory, University of Illinois, US)

  • Karen Turner

    ()

    (Department of Economics, University of Strathclyde)

Our current research program is concerned with developing regional and interregional computable general equilibrium models for Chicago and the Midwest respectively. One of the main concerns associated with regional CGE modeling is determination of the empirical parameters of models, particularly elasticities and share parameters. A common problem is the lack of appropriate regional data for econometric estimation. Consequently, it is important to identify key parameters that are likely to be important in determining quantitative results and prioritise these for estimation where appropriate data are available. In this paper we focus on estimating regional trade (import) substitution parameters, both because these will generally be important in analysis for regional economies, which tend to be more open than national economies, and also because one of the main areas of our current research is to model the pollution content of trade flows between regions and the impacts on pollution ‘trade balances’ in response to changes in activity. While our work will eventually encompass the five Midwest states of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio and Wisconsin, our first step in the process of parameter estimation for our intended suite of regional and interregional CGE models is to estimate commodity import elasticities for the Illinois economy (to be applied also to our single region Chicago model, in the absence of appropriate data for region-specific estimation at that level). We apply a model where we take account of market size and distance in estimating the substitutability between commodities produced in Illinois and other US states.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www.strath.ac.uk/media/departments/economics/researchdiscussionpapers/2008/08-10(REVISED).pdf
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by University of Strathclyde Business School, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 0810.

as
in new window

Length: 22 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:str:wpaper:0810
Contact details of provider: Postal: Sir William Duncan Building, 130 Rottenrow, Glasgow G4 0GE
Phone: +44 (0)141 548 3842
Fax: +44 (0)141 548 4445
Web page: http://www.strath.ac.uk/economics/
Email:


More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Hélène Erkel-Rousse & Daniel Mirza, 2002. "Import price elasticities: reconsidering the evidence," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 35(2), pages 282-306, May.
  2. Stephen P. King, 2000. "Introduction," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 33(1), pages 65-66.
  3. Turner, Karen, 2008. "A computable general equilibrium analysis of the relative price sensitivity required to induce rebound effects in response to an improvement in energy efficiency in the UK economy," SIRE Discussion Papers 2008-20, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE).
  4. Linda Ferguson & David Learmonth & Peter G McGregor & J Kim Swales & Karen Turner, 2007. "The impact of the Barnett formula on the Scottish economy: endogenous population and variable formula proportions," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 39(12), pages 3008-3027, December.
  5. Hanley, Nick & McGregor, Peter G. & Swales, J. Kim & Turner, Karen, 2009. "Do increases in energy efficiency improve environmental quality and sustainability?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(3), pages 692-709, January.
  6. Karen Turner, 2008. "A Computable General Equilibrium Analysis of the Relative Price Sensitivity Required to Induce Rebound Effects in Response to an Improvement in Energy Efficiency in the UK Economy," Working Papers 0807, University of Strathclyde Business School, Department of Economics.
  7. Domingues, Edson P. & Haddad, Eduardo A. & Hewings, Geoffrey, 2008. "Sensitivity analysis in applied general equilibrium models: An empirical assessment for MERCOSUR free trade areas agreements," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 48(2), pages 287-306, May.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:str:wpaper:0810. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Kirsty Hall)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.