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Nitrate Pollution Due to Agriculture, Project Report No. 3: Should the Polluter Pay?

Author

Listed:
  • David Parsisson
  • Nick Hanley
  • Clive L. Spash

Abstract

The Polluter Pays Principle is a well-established guiding force behind the regulation of polluters in the OECD. Agriculture, however, has frequently been exempt from this principle. This paper considers the reasons for this exemption, with particular reference to the control of nitrate pollution. After outlining the problems in applying many standard pollution control policies to nitrates, we move on to analyse the Nitrate Sensitive Areas scheme in the UK, which is a voluntary subsidy scheme. Reasons for differential take-up rates, and evidence on the effectiveness of the scheme are investigated. Finally, we consider the applicability of this approach to other forms of agricultural pollution.
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Suggested Citation

  • David Parsisson & Nick Hanley & Clive L. Spash, "undated". "Nitrate Pollution Due to Agriculture, Project Report No. 3: Should the Polluter Pay?," Working Papers Series e94/9, University of Stirling, Division of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:stl:stlewp:e94/9
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Hanley, Nick, 1990. "The Economics of Nitrate Pollution," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 17(2), pages 129-151.
    2. Nick Hanley, 1990. "The Economics of Nitrate Pollution Control in the UK," Working Papers Series 90/5, University of Stirling, Division of Economics.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • Q52 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Pollution Control Adoption and Costs; Distributional Effects; Employment Effects
    • Q53 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Air Pollution; Water Pollution; Noise; Hazardous Waste; Solid Waste; Recycling

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