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Visible Minority Neighbourhood Enclaves and Labour Market Outcomes of Immigrants

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  • Hou, Feng
  • Picot, Garnett

Abstract

Using Census data from 1981, 1986, 1991 and 1996, this study examined the association between living in a visible minority enclave and immigrants' labour market outcomes in Canada's three largest cities. The results showed that the number of such enclaves, defined as census tracts with at least 30% of the population from a single visible minority group (Chinese, South Asian or Black), increased from 6 in 1981 to 142 in 1996, mostly in Toronto and Vancouver. The association between exposure to own-group neighbours and employment was at times negative, but generally not significant. Exposure to own-group neighbours and working in a segregated occupation was positively, but not significantly, associated. Little association existed between exposure and employment earnings. However, there were some important group differences. The associations between exposure to own-group neighbours and labour market outcomes were usually very weak among Chinese immigrants, but often negative and strong among Black immigrants.

Suggested Citation

  • Hou, Feng & Picot, Garnett, 2003. "Visible Minority Neighbourhood Enclaves and Labour Market Outcomes of Immigrants," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2003204e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
  • Handle: RePEc:stc:stcp3e:2003204e
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    File URL: http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/olc-cel/olc.action?ObjId=11F0019M2003204&ObjType=46&lang=en&limit=0
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Nick Buck, 2001. "Identifying Neighbourhood Effects on Social Exclusion," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 38(12), pages 2251-2275, November.
    2. B.R. Chiswick & P.W. Miller, 2000. "Do Enclaves Matter in Immigrant Adjustment?," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 00-19, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
    3. Oreopoulos, Philip, 2002. "Do Neighbourhoods Influence Long-term Labour Market Success? A Comparison of Adults Who Grew up in Different Public Housing Projects," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2002185e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    4. Borjas, George J, 1995. "Ethnicity, Neighborhoods, and Human-Capital Externalities," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(3), pages 365-390, June.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Hou, Feng, 2004. "Recent Immigration and the Formation of Visible Minority Neighbourhoods in Canada's Large Cities," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2004221e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    2. Deepti Goel & Kevin Lang, 2009. "Social Ties and the Job Search of Recent Immigrants," NBER Working Papers 15186, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Haan, Michael, 2005. "Are Immigrants Buying to Get In?: The Role of Ethnic Clustering on the Homeownership Propensities of 12 Toronto Immigrant Groups, 1996-2001," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2005252e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    4. Deepti Goel & Kevin Lang, 2009. "Social Ties and the Job Search of Recent Immigrants," NBER Working Papers 15186, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Hou, Feng, 2008. "Immigrants Working with Co-ethnics: Who Are They and How Do They Fare Economically?," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2008310e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    6. repec:zbw:rwirep:0536 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Schaffner, Sandra & Treude, Barbara, 2014. "The Effect of Ethnic Clustering on Migrant Integration in Germany," Ruhr Economic Papers 536, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.

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