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Strategic investment in climate friendly technologies: the impact of permit trade




Our point of departure is that a group of developed countries invest in the development of greenhouse gas (GHG) abatement technologies both at home and in developing countries. Such investments reduce the cost of future GHG abatement, and influence the future GHG abatement choices of both developed and developing countries. We show how a common permit market affects the industrialized countries' strategic investment decisions. As opposed to a situation without a permit market, the industrialized countries may want to overinvest in new GHG abatement technologies both at home and abroad. That is, they increase their R&D investment to such an extent that the cost reductions from the least profitable project actually fall short of the R&D costs. Earlier research has only pointed to overinvestment abroad. Moreover, the effects of investment abroad may be tougher emission reduction targets at home, which is not possible without permit trade.

Suggested Citation

  • Mads Greaker & Cathrine Hagem, 2010. "Strategic investment in climate friendly technologies: the impact of permit trade," Discussion Papers 615, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:ssb:dispap:615

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Hoel, Michael, 1991. "Global environmental problems: The effects of unilateral actions taken by one country," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 55-70, January.
    2. Parkash Chander & Henry Tulkens, 1995. "A core-theoretic solution for the design of cooperative agreements on transfrontier pollution," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 2(2), pages 279-293, August.
    3. Helm, Carsten, 2003. "International emissions trading with endogenous allowance choices," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(12), pages 2737-2747, December.
    4. Carbone, Jared C. & Helm, Carsten & Rutherford, Thomas F., 2009. "The case for international emission trade in the absence of cooperative climate policy," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 58(3), pages 266-280, November.
    5. Wolfgang Buchholz & Kai Konrad, 1994. "Global environmental problems and the strategic choice of technology," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 60(3), pages 299-321, October.
    6. John Stranlund, 1996. "On the strategic potential of technological aid in international environmental relations," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 64(1), pages 1-22, February.
    7. Bjart J. Holtsmark & Dag Einar Sommervoll, 2008. "International emissions trading in a non-cooperative equilibrium," Discussion Papers 542, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    8. Goulder, Lawrence H. & Mathai, Koshy, 2000. "Optimal CO2 Abatement in the Presence of Induced Technological Change," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 1-38, January.
    9. John K. Stranlund, 1999. "Sunk Capital and Negotiated Resolutions of Environmental Conflicts," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 75(1), pages 142-155.
    10. Golombek Rolf & Hoel Michael, 2004. "Unilateral Emission Reductions and Cross-Country Technology Spillovers," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 3(2), pages 1-27, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:zbw:hohpro:341 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Carsten Helm & Stefan Pichler, 2015. "Climate Policy with Technology Transfers and Permit Trading," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 60(1), pages 37-54, January.
    3. repec:old:wpaper:341 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item


    greenhouse gas abatement technologies; climate policy; strategic investments; permit trade.;

    JEL classification:

    • D62 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Externalities
    • H41 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Public Goods
    • O38 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Government Policy
    • Q58 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Government Policy

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