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How do Spot prices affect aggregate electricity demand?




All participants in power exchanges are interested in market responses when electricity prices change because this influences the profitability of actions. Contrary to most econometric work in this field, which uses annual time series or panel data, we exploit high-frequency data from a power exchange to estimate the spot price elasticities of the total market and of different market segments. The use of such data requires a simultaneous market model including both behavioral and control variables to capture short-term shifts in both demand and supply. Compared with Wolfram (1999) our short-term responses to spot market prices are not straightforward because the picture is confused by differences in production flexibilities in a complex and heterogeneous supply side, demand technologies and a combination of different end-user contracts. We show that short- and long-run price effects on demand differ significantly among hours, weekdays, seasons, and countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Torstein Bye & Petter Vegard Hansen, 2008. "How do Spot prices affect aggregate electricity demand?," Discussion Papers 527, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:ssb:dispap:527

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Littlechild, Stephen, 2006. "Competition and contracts in the Nordic residential electricity markets," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 135-147, September.
    2. Bye, Torstein & Bruvoll, Annegrete & Aune, Finn Roar, 2008. "Inflow shortages in deregulated power markets -- Reasons for concern?," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 1693-1711, July.
    3. Amundsen, Eirik S. & Bergman, Lars, 2007. "Integration of multiple national markets for electricity: The case of Norway and Sweden," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(6), pages 3383-3394, June.
    4. Torstein Bye & Einar Hope, 2005. "Deregulation of electricity markets : The Norwegian experience," Discussion Papers 433, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    5. Amundsen, Eirik S. & Bergman, Lars, 2006. "Why has the Nordic electricity market worked so well?," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 148-157, September.
    6. Nesbakken, Runa, 1999. "Price sensitivity of residential energy consumption in Norway," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(6), pages 493-515, December.
    7. Johnsen, Tor Arnt, 2001. "Demand, generation and price in the Norwegian market for electric power," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 227-251, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bye, Torstein & Bruvoll, Annegrete & Aune, Finn Roar, 2008. "Inflow shortages in deregulated power markets -- Reasons for concern?," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 1693-1711, July.
    2. Mirza, Faisal Mehmood & Bergland, Olvar, 2011. "The impact of daylight saving time on electricity consumption: Evidence from southern Norway and Sweden," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(6), pages 3558-3571, June.
    3. Kopsakangas Savolainen, Maria & Svento, Rauli, 2012. "Real-Time Pricing in the Nordic Power markets," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 1131-1142.

    More about this item


    Electricity demand; Simultaneous markets; High Frequent data; Electricity Exhange;

    JEL classification:

    • Q41 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Demand and Supply; Prices
    • D01 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Microeconomic Behavior: Underlying Principles
    • D51 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - Exchange and Production Economies

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