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Inflow shortages in deregulated power markets -- Reasons for concern?

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  • Bye, Torstein
  • Bruvoll, Annegrete
  • Aune, Finn Roar

Abstract

In many countries hydropower constitutes a large share of the electricity producing capacity. In the earlier regulated electricity markets, production capacities exceeded demand due to security of supply concerns. The present deregulated markets base investments upon profitability alone, and security of supply issues are claimed to be less important. Market operators trust the pricing mechanism in competitive markets to clear. Then low inflow constitutes a less problem. Several markets, both under regulated and deregulated regimes, have faced serious droughts. Some of them have experienced problems with market clearance (Chile, Brazil, California) while other markets functioned well (The Nordic market). Important features to the market response are the flexibility of demand, the pattern of inflow shortage, the storage capacities, the possibility of trade between regions with different production technologies, and the market design and concentration. We apply an empirical based market model to simulate the effects under two inflow shortage scenarios in an international market with combined hydro and thermal capacities and restricted transmission capacities. We compare the scenarios with actual events and show that the model and the real market outcome are comparable. The simulations do not reveal any problems with the functioning of the market, which should calm down the anxiousness about security of supply in deregulated markets with stochastic energy supply.

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  • Bye, Torstein & Bruvoll, Annegrete & Aune, Finn Roar, 2008. "Inflow shortages in deregulated power markets -- Reasons for concern?," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 1693-1711, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:30:y:2008:i:4:p:1693-1711
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Bruno De Borger & Kristiaan Kerstens & Diego Prior & Ignace Van de Woestyne, 2013. "Static efficiency decompositions and capacity utilization: integrating economic and technical capacity notions," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(24), pages 3529-3529, August.
    2. Wolfgang, Ove & Haugstad, Arne & Mo, Birger & Gjelsvik, Anders & Wangensteen, Ivar & Doorman, Gerard, 2009. "Hydro reservoir handling in Norway before and after deregulation," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 34(10), pages 1642-1651.
    3. Torstein Bye & Petter Vegard Hansen, 2008. "How do Spot prices affect aggregate electricity demand?," Discussion Papers 527, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    4. Sandsmark, Maria, 2009. "A regional energy paradox--the case of Central Norway," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(11), pages 4549-4556, November.

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