IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/spo/wpmain/infohdl2441-7hhel11bit99d9nrdl3gjukcv5.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Teachers’ careers and students’ paths in higher education. Three essays on public policy evaluation

Author

Listed:
  • Pierre Gouedard

    (Département d'économie)

Abstract

Cette thèse propose trois évaluations ex-post de politiques publiques en France dans le monde de l’éducation. Chacune des sections vise à contribuer au cadre d’analyse interdisciplinaire de l’évaluation en apportant les outils de la modélisation économétrique. Le premier chapitre de la thèse s’intéresse aux effets, sur les enseignants du second degré, de la réforme de 2003 du système public français des retraites (modification des incitations financières). Le modèle de Stock and Wise y est estimé de manière structurelle. Le second chapitre analyse une composante de la réforme de 2010, à savoir le relèvement progressif de l’âge légal minimal de départ en retraite, et son impact sur les congés maladie de courte durée. Un modèle théorique d’optimisation est bâti, afin de justifier les régressions en panel dynamique non-linéaire. Le dernier chapitre évalue l’impact, à l’échelle du lycée, d’un programme français de discrimination positive sur l’accès global à l’éducation supérieure. Une méthodologie classique de différences-en-différences est employée.

Suggested Citation

  • Pierre Gouedard, 2017. "Teachers’ careers and students’ paths in higher education. Three essays on public policy evaluation," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/7hhel11bit9, Sciences Po.
  • Handle: RePEc:spo:wpmain:info:hdl:2441/7hhel11bit99d9nrdl3gjukcv5
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://spire.sciencespo.fr/hdl:/2441/7hhel11bit99d9nrdl3gjukcv5/resources/2017iepp0002-gouedard-pierre-these.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: https://spire.sciencespo.fr/hdl:/2441/7hhel11bit99d9nrdl3gjukcv5/resources/2017iepp0002-gouedard-pierre-resumefr.pdf
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Nina Guyon & Elise Huillery, 2021. "Biased Aspirations and Social Inequality at School: Evidence from French Teenagers," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 131(634), pages 745-796.
    2. Kenneth Y. Chay & Patrick J. McEwan & Miguel Urquiola, 2005. "The Central Role of Noise in Evaluating Interventions That Use Test Scores to Rank Schools," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(4), pages 1237-1258, September.
    3. James Fain, 2009. "Affirmative Action Can Increase Effort," Journal of Economic Interaction and Coordination, Springer;Society for Economic Science with Heterogeneous Interacting Agents, vol. 30(2), pages 168-175, June.
    4. Moro, Andrea & Norman, Peter, 2004. "A general equilibrium model of statistical discrimination," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 114(1), pages 1-30, January.
    5. Eric Furstenberg, 2005. "Does Banning Affirmative Action Affect Racial SAT Score Gaps? An Empirical Analysis," Working Papers 21, Department of Economics, College of William and Mary, revised 28 Sep 2005.
    6. Marianne Bertrand & Esther Duflo & Sendhil Mullainathan, 2004. "How Much Should We Trust Differences-In-Differences Estimates?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 119(1), pages 249-275.
    7. Roland Fryer & Glenn C. Loury & Tolga Yuret, 2003. "Color-Blind Affirmative Action," NBER Working Papers 10103, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Coate, Stephen & Loury, Glenn C, 1993. "Will Affirmative-Action Policies Eliminate Negative Stereotypes?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(5), pages 1220-1240, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Kim, Young Chul & Loury, Glenn, 2009. "Group Reputation and the Dynamics of Statistical Discrimination," MPRA Paper 18765, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Andrea Moro & Peter Norman, 2019. "Endogenous Comparative Advantage," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 121(3), pages 1088-1124, July.
    3. Freund, Caroline & Jaud, Mélise, 2013. "Regime Change, Democracy and Growth," CEPR Discussion Papers 9282, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Thierry Verdier & Yves Zenou, 2004. "Racial Beliefs, Location, And The Causes Of Crime," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 45(3), pages 731-760, August.
    5. Feng, Shuaizhang & Zheng, Bingyong, 2009. "Cherry-Picking in Labor Market with Imperfect Information," IZA Discussion Papers 4309, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    6. Lommerud, Kjell Erik & Vagstad, Steinar, 2000. "Mommy Tracks and Public Policy: On Self-Fulfilling Prophecies and Gender Gaps in Promotion," CEPR Discussion Papers 2378, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    7. Jorge Pérez Pérez & Michael Suher, 2020. "The Efficacy of Hiring Credits in Distressed Areas," Working Papers 2020-05, Banco de México.
    8. Samuel Bowles & Glenn C. Loury & Rajiv Sethi, 2014. "Group Inequality," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 12(1), pages 129-152, February.
    9. Dario Cestau & Dennis Epple & Holger Sieg, 2017. "Admitting Students to Selective Education Programs: Merit, Profiling, and Affirmative Action," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 125(3), pages 761-797.
    10. Bhalotra, Sonia R. & Clarke, Damian & Gomes, Joseph & Venkataramani, Atheendar, 2018. "Maternal Mortality and Women's Political Participation," IZA Discussion Papers 11590, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    11. Ali M. Ahmed, 2008. "‘If You Believe That Discrimination Exists, It Will’*†," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 76(6), pages 613-628, December.
    12. Subhasish M. Chowdhury & Patricia Esteve-González & Anwesha Mukherjee, 2020. "Heterogeneity, Leveling the Playing Field, and Affirmative Action in Contests," Economics Series Working Papers 915, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    13. Olivier Bargain & Delphine Boutin & Hugues Champeaux, 2018. "Women's political participation and intrahousehold empowerment: Evidence from the Egyptian Arab Spring," Working Papers halshs-01804380, HAL.
    14. Lommerud, Kjell Erik & Straume, Odd Rune & Vagstad, Steinar, 2015. "Mommy tracks and public policy: On self-fulfilling prophecies and gender gaps in hiring and promotion," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 540-554.
    15. David Comerford & Jose V Rodriguez Mora & Michael J Watts, 2017. "The rise of meritocracy and the inheritance of advantage," Working Papers 1716, University of Strathclyde Business School, Department of Economics.
    16. Aaron Bodoh-Creed & Brent Hickman, 2016. "College Assignment as a Large Contest," Working Papers 2016-27, Becker Friedman Institute for Research In Economics.
    17. Thomas Breda & Son Thierry Ly, 2012. "Do professors really perpetuate the gender gap in science? Evidence from a natural experiment in a French higher education institution," Working Papers halshs-00677438, HAL.
    18. Jose Rodriguez Mora, 2013. "The inheritance of Advantage," 2013 Meeting Papers 872, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    19. Bhalotra, Sonia R. & Clarke, Damian & Gomes, Joseph & Venkataramani, Atheendar, 2018. "Maternal Mortality and Women's Political Participation," IZA Discussion Papers 11590, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    20. Peter Q. Blair & Bobby W. Chung, 2021. "Informed Choices: A Model of Occupational Licensing and Statistical Discrimination," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 21-351, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spo:wpmain:info:hdl:2441/7hhel11bit99d9nrdl3gjukcv5. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/ecspofr.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Spire @ Sciences Po Library (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/ecspofr.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.