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Territorial Economic Impacts of Climate Anomalies in Brazil

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  • Eduardo A. Haddad

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  • Alexandre A. Porsse, Paula C. Pereda

Abstract

This paper evaluates the systemic impact of climate variations in a regional perspective using an interregional CGE model integrated with a physical model estimated for agriculture in order to catch the effects of climate change. The climate anomalies are estimated for 2005 and represent deviations over the historic trend. The results of this paper suggest that the economic costs of climate anomalies can be significantly underestimated if only partial equilibrium effects (direct impact/damage) are accounted for. The results show that a general equilibrium approach can provide a better comprehension about the systemic impact of climate anomalies, suggesting the economic costs are higher than those that would be observed in a partial equilibrium analysis. In addition, intersectoral and interregional linkages as well price effects seem to be important transmission channels in the context of systemic impact of climate anomalies.

Suggested Citation

  • Eduardo A. Haddad & Alexandre A. Porsse, Paula C. Pereda, 2012. "Territorial Economic Impacts of Climate Anomalies in Brazil," Working Papers, Department of Economics 2012_20, University of São Paulo (FEA-USP).
  • Handle: RePEc:spa:wpaper:2012wpecon20
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Peter B. Dixon & Maureen T. Rimmer & Marinos E. Tsigas, 2004. "Macro, industry and state effects in the U.S. of removing major tariffs and quotas," Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre Working Papers g-146, Victoria University, Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre.
    2. Haddad, Eduardo A. & Hewings, Geoffrey J.D., 2005. "Market imperfections in a spatial economy: some experimental results," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 45(2-3), pages 476-496, May.
    3. E.A. Haddad & J. Bonet & G.J.D. Hewings & F.S. Perobelli, 2009. "Spatial aspects of trade liberalization in Colombia: A general equilibrium approach," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 88(4), pages 699-732, November.
    4. Gurgel Angelo & Reilly John M & Paltsev Sergey, 2007. "Potential Land Use Implications of a Global Biofuels Industry," Journal of Agricultural & Food Industrial Organization, De Gruyter, vol. 5(2), pages 1-36, December.
    5. Ruslana Palatnik & Roberto Roson, 2012. "Climate change and agriculture in computable general equilibrium models: alternative modeling strategies and data needs," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 112(3), pages 1085-1100, June.
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    7. Roberto Roson & Ruslana Rachel Palatnik, 2009. "Climate Change Assessment and Agriculture in General Equilibrium Models: Alternative Modeling Strategies," Working Papers 2009_08, Department of Economics, University of Venice "Ca' Foscari".
    8. Adams, Philip D. & Dixon, Peter B. & McDonald, Daina & Meagher, G. A. & Parmenter, Brian R., 1994. "Forecasts for the Australian economy using the MONASH model," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 10(4), pages 557-571, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Nicholas Kilimani & Jan van Heerden & Heinrich Bohlmann & Louise Roos, 2016. "Counting the cost of drought induced productivity losses in an agro-based economy: The case of Uganda," Working Papers 616, Economic Research Southern Africa.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    climate anomalies; systemic impact; interregional CGE analysis;

    JEL classification:

    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming
    • R13 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - General Equilibrium and Welfare Economic Analysis of Regional Economies

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