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The 'materials balance approach' to pollution: its origin, implications and acceptance

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Abstract

In their seminal paper on "production, consumption and externalities" (AER, 1969), Ayres and Kneese initiated a research program on comprehensive analysis and management of residuals and pollution based on two pillars: the study of the residuals-generating materials flow subject to the mass balance principle and the concept of pervasive (pollution) externality. The present paper aims at (i) recalling the origin of that program, (ii) sheding some light on its principal implications from today's perspective and (iii) giving a tentative assessment on how it has been received by environmental and resource economists over the last decades. It is argued that while the externality approach to pollution gained widespread acceptance, the research community was rather reluctant in following Ayres and Kneese's 'material balance approach'. It is shown that neglecting the mass balance principle may - but need not always - lead to flawed policy advice.

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  • Rüdiger Pethig, 2003. "The 'materials balance approach' to pollution: its origin, implications and acceptance," Volkswirtschaftliche Diskussionsbeiträge 105-03, Universität Siegen, Fakultät Wirtschaftswissenschaften, Wirtschaftsinformatik und Wirtschaftsrecht.
  • Handle: RePEc:sie:siegen:105-03
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    File URL: http://www.wiwi.uni-siegen.de/vwl/repec/sie/papers/105-03.pdf
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    1. Eichner, Thomas & Pethig, Rudiger, 2001. "Product Design and Efficient Management of Recycling and Waste Treatment," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 109-134, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kenneth Rødseth & Eirik Romstad, 2014. "Environmental Regulations, Producer Responses, and Secondary Benefits: Carbon Dioxide Reductions Under the Acid Rain Program," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 59(1), pages 111-135, September.
    2. repec:kap:enreec:v:67:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s10640-015-9974-1 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. K Hervé Dakpo, 2016. "On modeling pollution-generating technologies: a new formulation of the by-production approach," Working Papers SMART - LERECO 16-06, INRA UMR SMART-LERECO.
    4. Neophyta Empora & Theofanis P. Mamuneas & Thanasis Stengos, 2017. "Output and Pollution Abatement in a U.S. State Emission Function," University of Cyprus Working Papers in Economics 05-2017, University of Cyprus Department of Economics.
    5. Neophyta Empora & Theofanis Mamuneas, 2011. "The Effect of Emissions on U.S. State Total Factor Productivity Growth," Review of Economic Analysis, Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis, vol. 3(2), pages 149-172, October.
    6. Forsund, Finn R., 2009. "Good Modelling of Bad Outputs: Pollution and Multiple-Output Production," International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics, now publishers, vol. 3(1), pages 1-38, August.
    7. repec:spr:empeco:v:54:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s00181-016-1219-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Pethig, Rudiger, 2006. "Non-linear production, abatement, pollution and materials balance reconsidered," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 51(2), pages 185-204, March.

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