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Involuntary Unemployment versus "Involuntary Employment" : J.M. Keynes and Beyond

Author

Listed:
  • Yasuhiro Sakai

    () (Faculty of Economics, Shiga University)

Abstract

This paper is concerned with the important question of how and to what extent great economists such as Keynes, Knight, Hicks, Samuelson, Takata, and Morishima have been intermingled with each other. Our discussion focuses on the two key concepts in the labor markets; involuntary unemployment and "involuntary employment." On the one hand, there are so many persons in the street who are willing to work at the existing wages but cannot find jobs because of a shortage of the effective demand as a whole. This is clearly the issue of involuntary unemployment, which has been energetically tackled by J. M. Keynes and his followers since the 1930s.On the other hand, since the 1990s, there also have emerged so many people who must work unwillingly for their survivals at the minimal level of wages. This is a new issue of "involuntary employment" or "non-regular workers", which has recently been investigated by Nobuaki Takahashi, a rising Japanese economist. Although the Takahashi approach is an attractive one, it nevertheless seems to remain at the embryo stage, thus requiring further developments in many ways. The second Keynes would urgently be needed.

Suggested Citation

  • Yasuhiro Sakai, 2017. "Involuntary Unemployment versus "Involuntary Employment" : J.M. Keynes and Beyond," Discussion Papers CRR Discussion Paper Series A: General 25, Shiga University, Faculty of Economics,Center for Risk Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:shg:dpapea:25
    as

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    File URL: http://www.biwako.shiga-u.ac.jp/risk/RePEc/shg/dppdf//DPA25Sakai20170823.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2017
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Lucas, Robert E, Jr, 1978. "Unemployment Policy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 68(2), pages 353-357, May.
    2. Sawyer, Malcolm & Spencer, David, 2008. "On the definition of involuntary unemployment," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 718-735, April.
    3. Hicks, John, 2017. "A Market Theory of Money," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198796237.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Keynes; involuntary unemployment; Takata; sociological factors; non-regular workers; Takahashi; involuntary employment;

    JEL classification:

    • B22 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought since 1925 - - - Macroeconomics
    • E12 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Keynes; Keynesian; Post-Keynesian
    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity

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