IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/sbp/wpaper/31.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Dutch Disease Investigated: Empirical Evidence from Selected South-East Asian Economies

Author

Listed:
  • Shahid Hussain Javaid

    () (State Bank of Pakistan)

Abstract

The objective of this paper is to investigate Dutch Disease hypothesis by analyzing foreign inflows power to appreciate real exchange rate as well as calculate the degree of contraction in the tradable sector among selected South East Asian countries over 1981-2007. Using static and dynamic panel data techniques, the study first estimates real exchange rate appreciation due to surge in foreign inflows and then estimates contraction in the tradable and expansion in the non-tradable sector. On the basis of empirical estimation the study confirms the Dutch Disease hypothesis in the countries of analysis.

Suggested Citation

  • Shahid Hussain Javaid, 2009. "Dutch Disease Investigated: Empirical Evidence from Selected South-East Asian Economies," SBP Working Paper Series 31, State Bank of Pakistan, Research Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:sbp:wpaper:31
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sbp.org.pk/repec/sbp/wpaper/wp31.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2009
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Guillermo A. Calvo & Leonardo Leiderman & Carmen M. Reinhart, 1993. "Capital Inflows and Real Exchange Rate Appreciation in Latin America: The Role of External Factors," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 40(1), pages 108-151, March.
    2. Ralph Chami & Connel Fullenkamp & Samir Jahjah, 2005. "Are Immigrant Remittance Flows a Source of Capital for Development?," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 52(1), pages 55-81, April.
    3. Sebastian Edwards, 2000. "Capital Flows, Real Exchange Rates, and Capital Controls: Some Latin American Experiences," NBER Chapters,in: Capital Flows and the Emerging Economies: Theory, Evidence, and Controversies, pages 197-246 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Raghuram G. Rajan & Arvind Subramanian, 2008. "Aid and Growth: What Does the Cross-Country Evidence Really Show?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 90(4), pages 643-665, November.
    5. Blundell, Richard & Bond, Stephen, 1998. "Initial conditions and moment restrictions in dynamic panel data models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 87(1), pages 115-143, August.
    6. Reinhart, Carmen & Calvo, Guillermo & Leiderman, Leonardo, 1992. "Capital Inflows and Real Exchange Rate Appreciation in Latin America," MPRA Paper 13843, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Galindo, Arturo & Izquierdo, Alejandro & Montero, Jose Manuel, 2007. "Real exchange rates, dollarization and industrial employment in Latin America," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 8(4), pages 284-298, December.
    8. Isabell Adenauer & Laurence Vagassky, 1998. "Aid and the real exchange rate: Dutch disease effects in African countries," Intereconomics: Review of European Economic Policy, Springer;German National Library of Economics;Centre for European Policy Studies (CEPS), vol. 33(4), pages 177-185, July.
    9. Emmanuel K. K. Lartey, 2007. "Capital inflows and the real exchange rate: An empirical study of sub-Saharan Africa," The Journal of International Trade & Economic Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(3), pages 337-357.
    10. Elbadawi, Ibrahim A & Soto, Raimundo, 1997. "Real Exchange Rates and Macroeconomic Adjustment in Sub-Saharan Africa and Other Developing Countries," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 6(3), pages 74-120, Supplemen.
    11. B Ouattara & E Strobl, 2003. "Do Aid Inflows Cause Dutch Disease? A Case Study of the CFA Franc Countries," The School of Economics Discussion Paper Series 0330, Economics, The University of Manchester.
    12. Prema-chandra Athukorala, 2003. "Foreign direct investment in crisis and recovery: lessons from the 1997-1998 Asian crisis," Australian Economic History Review, Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 43(2), pages 197-213, July.
    13. Galindo, Arturo & Izquierdo, Alejandro & Montero, Jose Manuel, 2007. "Real exchange rates, dollarization and industrial employment in Latin America," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 8(4), pages 284-298, December.
    14. Masanao Aoki & Sebastian Edwards, 1982. "Export Boom and Dutch Disease: A Dynamic Analysis," UCLA Economics Working Papers 269, UCLA Department of Economics.
    15. Prema-chandra Athukorala & Peter G. Warr, 2002. "Vulnerability to a Currency Crisis: Lessons from the Asian Experience," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 25(1), pages 33-57, January.
    16. Emmanuel K. K. Lartey, 2008. "Capital Inflows, Dutch Disease Effects, and Monetary Policy in a Small Open Economy," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 16(5), pages 971-989, November.
    17. Michael D. Bordo & Christopher M. Meissner, 2007. "Foreign Capital and Economic Growth in the First Era of Globalization," NBER Working Papers 13577, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    18. White, Howard & Wignaraja, Ganeshan, 1992. "Exchange rates, trade liberalization and aid: The Sri Lankan experience," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 20(10), pages 1471-1480, October.
    19. Yves Bourdet & Hans Falck, 2006. "Emigrants' remittances and Dutch Disease in Cape Verde," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(3), pages 267-284.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Inayat U. Mangla & Jamshed Y. Uppal, 2014. "Macro-economic Policies and Energy Security—Implications for a Chronic Energy Deficit Country," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 53(3), pages 255-273.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Foreign inflows; real exchange rate; dynamic panel data; dutch disease;

    JEL classification:

    • F33 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - International Monetary Arrangements and Institutions
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • E50 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - General

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:sbp:wpaper:31. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Faisal Saleem). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/sbpgvpk.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.