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Border Regimes And Indirect Productivity Effects From Foreign Direct Investment

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  • Bruno Merlevede
  • Victoria Purice

Abstract

Supplying inputs to foreign affiliates is consistently found to be an important source of productivity gains for domestic firms. We analyse the impact of border regimes on the existence and size of cross-border indirect productivity effects, exploiting variation in the pace and extent of European integration of seven Central and Eastern European countries and their neighbours during the period 2000-2010. EU-membership is a necessary condition for positive cross-border indirect productivity effects through backward linkages. Schengen area participation further magnifies cross-border effects. Our results bear testimony to the successful EU integration of CEECs and warn about potential productivity costs to local firms should border restrictions be reinstated.

Suggested Citation

  • Bruno Merlevede & Victoria Purice, 2019. "Border Regimes And Indirect Productivity Effects From Foreign Direct Investment," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 19/965, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.
  • Handle: RePEc:rug:rugwps:19/965
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Banking; FDI; Productivity; Spillovers; Borders;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F2 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business
    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity

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