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Firm size and spillover effects from foreign direct investment: the case of Romania

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  • Karolien Lenaerts

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  • Bruno Merlevede

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Abstract

This paper introduces firm size in the analysis of the productivity spillovers of foreign direct investment. Our analysis of a panel of Romanian firms reveals two main findings: only medium-sized foreign firms generate spillovers, and domestic firms’ size is of limited importance to identify which firms absorb spillovers. To explain these findings, we show that large foreign firms are less embedded in the domestic economy because they are more likely to bring their own suppliers, import intermediate inputs and export their output. Smaller foreign firms lack the scale to transmit spillovers to domestic firms. Whereas foreign firms’ size adequately proxies for these spillover mechanisms, domestic firms’ size has an unclear relationship with the different mechanisms. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Suggested Citation

  • Karolien Lenaerts & Bruno Merlevede, 2015. "Firm size and spillover effects from foreign direct investment: the case of Romania," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 45(3), pages 595-611, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:sbusec:v:45:y:2015:i:3:p:595-611
    DOI: 10.1007/s11187-015-9652-2
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11187-015-9652-2
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Iwasaki, Ichiro & Tokunaga, Masahiro, 2016. "Technology transfer and spillovers from FDI in transition economies: A meta-analysis," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(4), pages 1086-1114.
    2. Uwitonze, Eric & Heshmati, Almas, 2016. "Service Sector Development and its Determinants in Rwanda," IZA Discussion Papers 10117, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Foreign direct investment; Spillovers; Firm size; Supply chain; F2; D24; L23; L25; L26;

    JEL classification:

    • F2 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business
    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
    • L23 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Organization of Production
    • L25 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Firm Performance
    • L26 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Entrepreneurship

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