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Alternatives to Bank Finance: Role of Carbon Tax and Hometown Investment Trust Funds in Developing Green Energy Projects in Asia

Author

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  • Yoshino, Naoyuki

    (Asian Development Bank Institute)

  • Taghizadeh-Hesary, Farhad

    (Asian Development Bank Institute)

Abstract

The main obstacle to developing green energy projects is lack of access to finance. For larger energy projects (e.g., large hydropower projects), insurance and pensions are sustainable financing alternatives. Large energy projects are long-term investment projects; banks are not able to provide long-term loans because their resources (deposits) are short- to medium-term. Pension funds and insurance companies hold long-term savings, so these institutions could be a proper alternative for financing mega-size energy projects. On the other hand, because electricity tariffs are often regulated by the government, to increase the investment incentives the spillover effects originally created by energy supplies need to be used, and tax revenues refunded to the investors in energy projects. For smaller-size green projects, the paper provides a theoretical model for combining utilisation of carbon tax and a new way of financing risky capital, i.e., hometown investment trust funds (HITs). Because of the Basel capital requirement, and because most green energy projects from the point of view of financers are considered risky projects, many financers are reluctant to lend to them or they lend at high interest rates. We show that by taxing carbon dioxide (CO2), sulphur dioxide (SO2), and nitrogen oxides (NOx) and allocating those tax revenues to HITs, green projects will become more feasible and more interesting for hometown investors; hence the supply of investment money to these funds will increase.

Suggested Citation

  • Yoshino, Naoyuki & Taghizadeh-Hesary, Farhad, 2017. "Alternatives to Bank Finance: Role of Carbon Tax and Hometown Investment Trust Funds in Developing Green Energy Projects in Asia," ADBI Working Papers 761, Asian Development Bank Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:adbiwp:0761
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Pengran Zhou & Pengfei Zhou & Serhat Yüksel & Hasan Dinçer & Gülsüm Sena Uluer, 2019. "Balanced Scorecard-Based Evaluation of Sustainable Energy Investment Projects with IT2 Fuzzy Hybrid Decision Making Approach," Energies, MDPI, vol. 13(1), pages 1-20, December.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    carbon tax; green energy; renewable energy; hometown investment trust funds; HITs;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • Q21 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Demand and Supply; Prices

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