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Catch-up Cycle: A General Equilibrium Framework

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  • Peilin, Liu

    (Asian Development Bank Institute)

  • Shen, Jia

    (Asian Development Bank Institute)

  • Xun, Zhang

    (Asian Development Bank Institute)

Abstract

Certain stylized facts are common among successful economic latecomers: an inverse U-shaped gross domestic product and capital per capita growth rate, high growth rates during the catch-up period, and rapid structural changes. We propose, for the first time, a general equilibrium framework to document the catch-up cycle that a successful latecomer is likely to experience. We argue that technology adoption and imitation, and diminishing marginal returns to capital are the two driving forces of the catch-up cycle. The technological gap and speed/efficiency of technological catching-up are two fundamental factors for successful catching-up. This paper concludes with a case study for the People’s Republic of China and sheds light on the different policy choices at various stages of the catch-up cycle.

Suggested Citation

  • Peilin, Liu & Shen, Jia & Xun, Zhang, 2017. "Catch-up Cycle: A General Equilibrium Framework," ADBI Working Papers 660, Asian Development Bank Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:adbiwp:0660
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Catch-up cycle; Latecomers; General Equilibrium; Total Factor Productivity (TFP); China;

    JEL classification:

    • E13 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Neoclassical
    • E60 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - General
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

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