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Multivariate Stochastic Volatility with Co-Heteroscedasticity

Author

Listed:
  • Joshua Chan

    (Purdue University, USA)

  • Arnaud Doucet

    (University of Oxford, UK)

  • Roberto León-González

    (National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies, Japan; Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis)

  • Rodney W. Strachan

    () (School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia; Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis; Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis)

Abstract

This paper develops a new methodology that decomposes shocks into homoscedastic and heteroscedastic components. This specification implies there exist linear combinations of heteroscedastic variables that eliminate heteroscedasticity. That is, these linear combinations are homoscedastic; a property we call co-heteroscedasticity. The heteroscedastic part of the model uses a multivariate stochastic volatility inverse Wishart process. The resulting model is invariant to the ordering of the variables, which we show is important for impulse response analysis but is generally important for, e.g., volatility estimation and variance decompositions. The specification allows estimation in moderately high-dimensions. The computational strategy uses a novel particle filter algorithm, a reparameterization that substantially improves algorithmic convergence and an alternating-order particle Gibbs that reduces the amount of particles needed for accurate estimation. We provide two empirical applications; one to exchange rate data and another to a large Vector Autoregression (VAR) of US macroeconomic variables. We find strong evidence for co-heteroscedasticity and, in the second application, estimate the impact of monetary policy on the homoscedastic and heteroscedastic components of macroeconomic variables.

Suggested Citation

  • Joshua Chan & Arnaud Doucet & Roberto León-González & Rodney W. Strachan, 2018. "Multivariate Stochastic Volatility with Co-Heteroscedasticity," Working Paper series 18-38, Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis.
  • Handle: RePEc:rim:rimwps:18-38
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Gary Koop & Roberto Leon-Gonzalez & Rodney W. Strachan, 2008. "Bayesian Inference in the Time Varying Cointegration Model," Working Paper series 23_08, Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis.
    2. Marta Bańbura, 2008. "Large Bayesian VARs," 2008 Meeting Papers 334, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    3. Chiu, Ching-Wai (Jeremy) & Mumtaz, Haroon & Pintér, Gábor, 2017. "Forecasting with VAR models: Fat tails and stochastic volatility," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 1124-1143.
    4. Koop, Gary & Leon-Gonzalez, Roberto & Strachan, Rodney W., 2011. "Bayesian inference in a time varying cointegration model," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 165(2), pages 210-220.
    5. Roberto Casarin & Domenico Sartore, 2007. "Matrix-State Particle Filter for Wishart Stochastic Volatility Processes," Working Papers 2007_30, Department of Economics, University of Venice "Ca' Foscari".
    6. Durbin, James & Koopman, Siem Jan, 2012. "Time Series Analysis by State Space Methods," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, edition 2, number 9780199641178.
    7. Sangjoon Kim & Neil Shephard & Siddhartha Chib, 1998. "Stochastic Volatility: Likelihood Inference and Comparison with ARCH Models," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 65(3), pages 361-393.
    8. K. Triantafyllopoulos, 2012. "Multi‐variate stochastic volatility modelling using Wishart autoregressive processes," Journal of Time Series Analysis, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 33(1), pages 48-60, January.
    9. Andrea Carriero & Todd E. Clark & Massimiliano Marcellino, 2015. "Large Vector Autoregressions with Asymmetric Priors," Working Papers 759, Queen Mary University of London, School of Economics and Finance.
    10. Gourieroux, C. & Jasiak, J. & Sufana, R., 2009. "The Wishart Autoregressive process of multivariate stochastic volatility," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 150(2), pages 167-181, June.
    11. Chib S. & Jeliazkov I., 2001. "Marginal Likelihood From the Metropolis-Hastings Output," Journal of the American Statistical Association, American Statistical Association, vol. 96, pages 270-281, March.
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    13. Sims, Christopher A & Zha, Tao, 1998. "Bayesian Methods for Dynamic Multivariate Models," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 39(4), pages 949-968, November.
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    16. Chan, Joshua C.C., 2013. "Moving average stochastic volatility models with application to inflation forecast," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 176(2), pages 162-172.
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    18. Engle, Robert F, 1982. "Autoregressive Conditional Heteroscedasticity with Estimates of the Variance of United Kingdom Inflation," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(4), pages 987-1007, July.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Markov Chain Monte Carlo; Gibbs Sampling; Flexible Parametric Model; Particle Filter; Co-heteroscedasticity; state-space; reparameterization; alternating-order;

    JEL classification:

    • C11 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Bayesian Analysis: General
    • C15 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Statistical Simulation Methods: General

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