IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/rff/dpaper/dp-09-25-efd.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

To Trade or Not to Trade: Firm-Level Analysis of Emissions Trading in Santiago, Chile

Author

Listed:
  • Coria, Jessica
  • Löfgren, Åsa
  • Sterner, Thomas

Abstract

Whether tradable permits are appropriate for transition and developing economies—given their special social and cultural circumstances, such as the lack of institutions and lack of expertise with market-based policies—is much debated. We conducted interviews and surveyed a sample of firms subject to emissions trading programs in Santiago, Chile, one of the first cities outside the OECD that has implemented such trading. The information gathered allowed us to study which factors affect the performance of the trading programs in practice and the challenges and advantages of applying tradable permits in less developed countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Coria, Jessica & Löfgren, Åsa & Sterner, Thomas, 2009. "To Trade or Not to Trade: Firm-Level Analysis of Emissions Trading in Santiago, Chile," Discussion Papers dp-09-25-efd, Resources For the Future.
  • Handle: RePEc:rff:dpaper:dp-09-25-efd
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.rff.org/RFF/documents/EfD-DP-09-25.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Enrique Calfucura & Jessica Coria & José Miguel Sánchez, 2008. "Permisos Transables de Emisión en Chile: Lecciones, Desafíos y Oportunidades para Países en Desarrollo," Documentos de Trabajo 347, Instituto de Economia. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile..
    2. Palacios, Milagros & Ch Vez, Carlos, 2005. "Determinants of compliance in the emissions compensation program in Santiago, Chile," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 10(04), pages 453-483, August.
    3. Stavins Robert N., 1995. "Transaction Costs and Tradeable Permits," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 133-148, September.
    4. Coria, Jessica & Sterner, Thomas, 2008. "Tradable Permits in Developing Countries: Evidence from air pollution in Santiago, Chile," Working Papers in Economics 326, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
    5. Richard Schmalensee & Paul L. Joskow & A. Denny Ellerman & Juan Pablo Montero & Elizabeth M. Bailey, 1998. "An Interim Evaluation of Sulfur Dioxide Emissions Trading," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(3), pages 53-68, Summer.
    6. Montero, Juan-Pablo & Sanchez, Jose Miguel & Katz, Ricardo, 2002. "A Market-Based Environmental Policy Experiment in Chile," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 45(1), pages 267-287, April.
    7. Lata Gangadharan, 2000. "Transaction Costs in Pollution Markets: An Empirical Study," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 76(4), pages 601-614.
    8. Calfucura, Enrique & Coria, Jessica & Sánchez, José Miguel, 2009. "Permisos comerciables de emisión en Chile. Lecciones, desafíos y oportunidades para países en desarrollo," El Trimestre Económico, Fondo de Cultura Económica, vol. 0(304), pages 1027-1069, octubre-d.
    9. Robert N. Stavins, 1998. "What Can We Learn from the Grand Policy Experiment? Lessons from SO2 Allowance Trading," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(3), pages 69-88, Summer.
    10. Hahn, Robert W, 1989. "Economic Prescriptions for Environmental Problems: How the Patient Followed the Doctor's Orders," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 3(2), pages 95-114, Spring.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Caffera, Marcelo, 2011. "The use of economic instruments for pollution control in Latin America: lessons for future policy design," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 16(03), pages 247-273, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    tradable permits; developing countries; environmental policy; environmental institutions;

    JEL classification:

    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • Q58 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Government Policy
    • R52 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Regional Government Analysis - - - Land Use and Other Regulations

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:rff:dpaper:dp-09-25-efd. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Webmaster). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/degraus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.