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Intangibles, Inequality and Stagnation

Author

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  • Nobuhiro Kiyotaki

    (Princeton University)

  • Shengxing Zhang

    (London School of Economics)

Abstract

We examine how aggregate output and income distribution interact with accumulation of intangible capital over time and across individuals. We consider an overlapping generations economy in which managerial skill (intangible capital) is essential for production, and it is acquired by young workers through on-the-job training by old managers. We show that, when young trainees are not committed to staying in the same firms and repaying their debt, a small difference in initial endowment and ability of young workers leads to a large inequality in accumulation of intangibles and lifetime income. A negative shock to endowment or the degree of commitment generates a persistent stagnation and a rise in inequality.

Suggested Citation

  • Nobuhiro Kiyotaki & Shengxing Zhang, 2018. "Intangibles, Inequality and Stagnation," 2018 Meeting Papers 110, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed018:110
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    2. Oscar Jorda & Alan Taylor & Sanjay Singh, 2019. "The Long-Run Effects of Monetary Policy," 2019 Meeting Papers 1307, Society for Economic Dynamics.

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