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Wealth and Stock Market Participation: Estimating the Causal Effect From Swedish Lotteries

Author

Listed:
  • Robert Ostling

    (Stockholm University)

  • Erik Lindqvist

    (Stockholm School of Economics)

  • David Cesarini

    (New York University)

  • Joseph Briggs

    (New York University)

Abstract

In this paper we estimate the causal effect of wealth on stock market participation. The positive cross-sectional relationship between participation and wealth is well-established, with previous work suggesting that moderate costs of stock market participation are capable of rationalizing the decision of most non-participants. In our study we use a large sample of Swedish lottery players whom were randomly assigned over 1 billion USD, linked to administrative tax records of asset holdings, to precisely identify both the effect of wealth and the costs necessary to explain non-participation. Although we estimate a positive effect of wealth on participation, our estimate is much smaller than that implied by the cross-section. Furthermore, our estimates of participation costs are 10-20 times higher than those proposed in previous studies. We interpret these results within a structural model of life-cycle stock market participation, and use participation responses following random wealth assignment to estimate entry and participation costs conditional on a variety of demographic and individual characteristics. We conclude that it is unlikely that fixed financial costs are credible explanations for equity market non-participation.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert Ostling & Erik Lindqvist & David Cesarini & Joseph Briggs, 2015. "Wealth and Stock Market Participation: Estimating the Causal Effect From Swedish Lotteries," 2015 Meeting Papers 806, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed015:806
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Benedicte Apouey & Andrew E. Clark, 2015. "Winning Big but Feeling no Better? The Effect of Lottery Prizes on Physical and Mental Health," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(5), pages 516-538, May.
    2. Mikael Lindahl, 2005. "Estimating the Effect of Income on Health and Mortality Using Lottery Prizes as an Exogenous Source of Variation in Income," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 40(1).
    3. Annette Vissing-Jorgensen, 2000. "Towards an Explanation of Household Portfolio Choice Heterogeneity: Nonfinancial Income and Participation Cost Structures," Econometric Society World Congress 2000 Contributed Papers 1102, Econometric Society.
    4. Andreas Fagereng & Charles Gottlieb & Luigi Guiso, 2017. "Asset Market Participation and Portfolio Choice over the Life-Cycle," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 72(2), pages 705-750, April.
    5. Benedicte Apouey & Andrew E. Clark, 2015. "Winning Big but Feeling no Better? The Effect of Lottery Prizes on Physical and Mental Health," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(5), pages 516-538, May.
    6. Luis M. Viceira, 2001. "Optimal Portfolio Choice for Long‐Horizon Investors with Nontradable Labor Income," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 56(2), pages 433-470, April.
    7. Grossman, Sanford J & Laroque, Guy, 1990. "Asset Pricing and Optimal Portfolio Choice in the Presence of Illiquid Durable Consumption Goods," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 58(1), pages 25-51, January.
    8. Benedicte Apouey & Andrew E. Clark, 2015. "Winning Big but Feeling no Better? The Effect of Lottery Prizes on Physical and Mental Health," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(5), pages 516-538, May.
    9. Khorunzhina, Natalia, 2013. "Structural estimation of stock market participation costs," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 37(12), pages 2928-2942.
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    Cited by:

    1. Andreas Fagereng & Charles Gottlieb & Luigi Guiso, 2017. "Asset Market Participation and Portfolio Choice over the Life-Cycle," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 72(2), pages 705-750, April.
    2. Pavlo Illiashenko, 2017. "Behavioral Finance: Household Investment and Borrowing Decisions," Visnyk of the National Bank of Ukraine, National Bank of Ukraine, issue 242, pages 28-48.
    3. Sumit Agarwal & Vyacheslav Mikhed & Barry Scholnick, 2016. "Does inequality cause financial distress? Evidence from lottery winners and neighboring bankruptcies," Working Papers 16-4, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
    4. Cristian Badarinza & John Y. Campbell & Tarun Ramadorai, 2016. "International Comparative Household Finance," Annual Review of Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 8(1), pages 111-144, October.
    5. Li, Han & Li, Jiangyi & Lu, Yi & Xie, Huihua, 2020. "Housing wealth and labor supply: Evidence from a regression discontinuity design," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 183(C).

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