IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/red/sed014/993.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

International Comovement through Endogenous Long Run Risk

Author

Listed:
  • Ana Maria Santacreu

    (INSEAD)

  • Federico Gavazzoni

    (INSEAD)

Abstract

The international macroeconomics literature has had a hard time capturing the joint comovement of quantities and asset prises across countries. We introduce recursive preferences in an endogenous growth model of innovation and technology adoption through trade in varieties and provide an explanation of these comovements. In our model, growth is risky, and it affects current and future expected profits through its effect on the equilibrium marginal rate of substitution. We calibrate the model to data on productivity, R\&D and trade in intermediate goods and show that the comovement in quantities across countries is mainly determined by the comovement in current profits, whereas the comovement in asset prices is mainly determined by the comoevement in future expected profits across countries. With such mechanism, we can therefore reconcile a low comovement in quantities with a high comovement in asset prices.

Suggested Citation

  • Ana Maria Santacreu & Federico Gavazzoni, 2014. "International Comovement through Endogenous Long Run Risk," 2014 Meeting Papers 993, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed014:993
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://economicdynamics.org/meetpapers/2014/paper_993.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Christian Broda & Joshua Greenfield & David Weinstein, 2006. "From Groundnuts to Globalization: A Structural Estimate of Trade and Growth," NBER Working Papers 12512, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Ravi Bansal & Dana Kiku & Amir Yaron, 2012. "Risks For the Long Run: Estimation with Time Aggregation," NBER Working Papers 18305, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Fabio Ghironi & Marc J. Melitz, 2005. "International Trade and Macroeconomic Dynamics with Heterogeneous Firms," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 120(3), pages 865-915.
    4. Brandt, Michael W. & Cochrane, John H. & Santa-Clara, Pedro, 2006. "International risk sharing is better than you think, or exchange rates are too smooth," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(4), pages 671-698, May.
    5. Ravi Bansal & Amir Yaron, 2004. "Risks for the Long Run: A Potential Resolution of Asset Pricing Puzzles," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 59(4), pages 1481-1509, August.
    6. Santacreu, Ana Maria, 2015. "Innovation, diffusion, and trade: Theory and measurement," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 1-20.
    7. Diego Comin & Mark Gertler, 2006. "Medium-Term Business Cycles," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(3), pages 523-551, June.
    8. Riccardo Colacito & Mariano M. Croce, 2013. "International Asset Pricing with Recursive Preferences," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 68(6), pages 2651-2686, December.
    9. Romer, Paul M, 1990. "Endogenous Technological Change," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(5), pages 71-102, October.
    10. Jermann, Urban J., 1998. "Asset pricing in production economies," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(2), pages 257-275, April.
    11. Maurice Obstfeld & Kenneth Rogoff, 2001. "The Six Major Puzzles in International Macroeconomics: Is There a Common Cause?," NBER Chapters,in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 2000, Volume 15, pages 339-412 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Riccardo Colacito & Mariano M. Croce, 2011. "Risks for the Long Run and the Real Exchange Rate," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 119(1), pages 153-181.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:red:sed014:993. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Christian Zimmermann). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/sedddea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.