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Forecast Shocks in Production Networks

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  • Can Tian

    (University of Pennsylvania)

Abstract

This paper proposes a dynamic multi-sector production network model in which firms receive news on the future product-specific demand of a representative household. Since production takes time and firms in the production sectors are connected via input-output links, news on the future final demand of an individual product changes firms' forecasts of their future sales, creating economy-wide effects named as forecast shocks. Forecast shocks are transferred upwards through the supplier-customer connections in the network, from the buyer of an input good to the producer. The model explains the asymmetry in the transmission of individual shocks in the network and how shocks to the expectations generate real, persistent effects. The equilibrium is analytically solved and calibrated to the U.S. economy. A preliminary estimation under the assumptions for the shock processes shows the importance of the forecast shocks.

Suggested Citation

  • Can Tian, 2014. "Forecast Shocks in Production Networks," 2014 Meeting Papers 87, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed014:87
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    File URL: https://economicdynamics.org/meetpapers/2014/paper_87.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Andrew T. Foerster & Pierre-Daniel G. Sarte & Mark W. Watson, 2011. "Sectoral versus Aggregate Shocks: A Structural Factor Analysis of Industrial Production," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 119(1), pages 1-38.
    2. Bryan Kelly & Hanno Lustig & Stijn Van Nieuwerburgh, 2013. "Firm Volatility in Granular Networks," NBER Working Papers 19466, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Saki Bigio, 2013. "Financial Frictions in Production Networks," 2013 Meeting Papers 121, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    4. Shea, John S, 2002. "Complementarities and Comovements," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 34(2), pages 412-433, May.
    5. Xavier Gabaix, 2011. "The Granular Origins of Aggregate Fluctuations," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 79(3), pages 733-772, May.
    6. Boyan Jovanovic, 1987. "Micro Shocks and Aggregate Risk," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 102(2), pages 395-409.
    7. Guido Lorenzoni, 2011. "News and Aggregate Demand Shocks," Annual Review of Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 3(1), pages 537-557, September.
    8. Lauren Cohen & Andrea Frazzini, 2008. "Economic Links and Predictable Returns," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 63(4), pages 1977-2011, August.
    9. Timothy G. Conley & Bill Dupor, 2003. "A Spatial Analysis of Sectoral Complementarity," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 111(2), pages 311-352, April.
    10. Dupor, Bill, 1999. "Aggregation and irrelevance in multi-sector models," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 391-409, April.
    11. Horvath, Michael, 2000. "Sectoral shocks and aggregate fluctuations," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(1), pages 69-106, February.
    12. Michael Horvath, 1998. "Cyclicality and Sectoral Linkages: Aggregate Fluctuations from Independent Sectoral Shocks," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 1(4), pages 781-808, October.
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