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Startups, Credit, and the Jobless Recovery

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  • Immo Schott

    (EUI)

Abstract

Abstract Job creation depends on a firm's age. Startups (firms of age zero) and young firms play a crucial role for job creation: they grow faster and create more net jobs than older incumbent firms. During the 2008-2009 recession the jobs created by those firms declined considerably, aversely affecting aggregate employment figures. While net job creation by existing firms is beginnig to recover, job creation by startups in 2010 was at its lowest point since 1983 and continues to be at historically low levels. This paper argues that the conditions on the credit market are linked to the 'jobless recovery' phenomenon. Especially young and small firms are still finding it difficult to obtain credit, limiting their growth prospects and job creation. The paper links regional conditions in the US housing market to state-level data on job creation by startups. I then estimate a search model augmented with heterogeneous firms, entry and exit, and financial frictions. This model is able to match key moments of the firm distribution and employment at the micro- and macrolevel. In the context of this model I analyze the effects of a 'credit crunch' and consider possible policies to boost job creation by startups.

Suggested Citation

  • Immo Schott, 2013. "Startups, Credit, and the Jobless Recovery," 2013 Meeting Papers 340, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed013:340
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    File URL: https://economicdynamics.org/meetpapers/2013/paper_340.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Den Haan, Wouter J., 2010. "Assessing the accuracy of the aggregate law of motion in models with heterogeneous agents," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 79-99, January.
    2. Juan M. Sánchez & Constanza S. Liborio, 2012. "Starting a business during a recovery: this time, it's different," The Regional Economist, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Jan.
    3. Puri, Manju & Rocholl, Jörg & Steffen, Sascha, 2011. "Global retail lending in the aftermath of the US financial crisis: Distinguishing between supply and demand effects," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 100(3), pages 556-578, June.
    4. John C. Haltiwanger & Ron S. Jarmin & Javier Miranda, 2010. "Who Creates Jobs? Small vs. Large vs. Young," NBER Working Papers 16300, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Campello, Murillo & Graham, John R. & Harvey, Campbell R., 2010. "The real effects of financial constraints: Evidence from a financial crisis," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 97(3), pages 470-487, September.
    6. Michael R. Darby & John C. Haltiwanger & Mark W. Plant, 1986. "The Ins and Outs of Unemployment: The Ins Win," UCLA Economics Working Papers 411, UCLA Department of Economics.
    7. Jimenez Porras, G. & Ongena, S. & Peydro, J.L. & Saurina, J., 2012. "Credit Supply versus Demand : Bank and Firm Balance-Sheet Channels in Good and Crisis Times," Discussion Paper 2012-005, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    8. Coles, Melvyn G & Kelishomi, Ali Moghaddasi, 2011. "New Business Start-ups and the Business Cycle," CEPR Discussion Papers 8588, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
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