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Do Referrals Lead to Better Matches? Evidence from a Firm's Employee

  • Giorgio Topa

    (Federal Reserve Bank of New York)

  • Elizabeth Setren

    (Federal Reserve Bank of New York)

  • Meta Brown

    (Federal Reserve Bank of New York)

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File URL: https://www.economicdynamics.org/meetpapers/2011/paper_711.pdf
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Paper provided by Society for Economic Dynamics in its series 2011 Meeting Papers with number 711.

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Date of creation: 2011
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Handle: RePEc:red:sed011:711
Contact details of provider: Postal: Society for Economic Dynamics Christian Zimmermann Economic Research Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis PO Box 442 St. Louis MO 63166-0442 USA
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Web page: http://www.EconomicDynamics.org/society.htm
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  1. Davezies, Laurent & d'Haultfoeuille, Xavier & Fougère, Denis, 2006. "Identification of Peer Effects Using Group Size Variation," IZA Discussion Papers 2324, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Elie Tamer, 2003. "Incomplete Simultaneous Discrete Response Model with Multiple Equilibria," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 70(1), pages 147-165, January.
  3. Patacchini, Eleonora & Zenou, Yves, 2009. "Juvenile Delinquency and Conformism," CEPR Discussion Papers 7565, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  4. Peter Kooreman & Adriaan R. Soetevent, 2007. "A discrete-choice model with social interactions: with an application to high school teen behavior," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(3), pages 599-624.
  5. Graham, Bryan S. & Hahn, Jinyong, 2005. "Identification and estimation of the linear-in-means model of social interactions," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 88(1), pages 1-6, July.
  6. Ariel Pakes & Michael Ostrovsky & Steve Berry, 2004. "Simple Estimators for the Parameters of Discrete Dynamic Games (with Entry/Exit Samples)," NBER Working Papers 10506, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Case, A.C. & Katz, L.F., 1991. "The Company You Keep: The Effects Of Family And Neighborhood On Disadvantaged Younths," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1555, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
  8. Victor Aguirregabiria & Pedro Mira, 2004. "Sequential Estimation of Dynamic Discrete Games," Industrial Organization 0406006, EconWPA.
  9. Ellison, Glenn & Fudenberg, Drew, 1993. "Rules of Thumb for Social Learning," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(4), pages 612-43, August.
  10. Antoni Calvo-Armengol & Eleonora Patacchini & Yves Zenou, 2008. "Peer Effects and Social Networks in Education," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 0814, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  11. Elie Tamer & Federico Ciliberto, 2004. "Market Structure and Multiple Equilibria in Airline Markets," Econometric Society 2004 North American Winter Meetings 517, Econometric Society.
  12. Federico Echenique & Ivana Komunjer, 2009. "Testing Models With Multiple Equilibria by Quantile Methods," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 77(4), pages 1281-1297, 07.
  13. Donna B. Gilleskie & Koleman S. Strumpf, 2000. "The Behavioral Dynamics of Youth Smoking," NBER Working Papers 7838, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  14. repec:bla:restud:v:74:y:2007:i:3:p:897-935 is not listed on IDEAS
  15. Patrick Bajari & C. Lanier Benkard & Jonathan Levin, 2007. "Estimating Dynamic Models of Imperfect Competition," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 75(5), pages 1331-1370, 09.
  16. Andrea Moro, 2003. "The Effect Of Statistical Discrimination On Black-White Wage Inequality: Estimating A Model With Multiple Equilibria," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 44(2), pages 467-500, 05.
  17. Edward C. Norton & Richard C. Lindrooth & Susan T. Ennett, 1998. "Controlling for the endogeneity of peer substance use on adolescent alcohol and tobacco use," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 7(5), pages 439-453.
  18. Krauth, Brian V., 2006. "Simulation-based estimation of peer effects," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 133(1), pages 243-271, July.
  19. Patrick Bajari & Han Hong & John Krainer & Denis Nekipelov, 2006. "Estimating Static Models of Strategic Interaction," NBER Working Papers 12013, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  20. Arie Beresteanu & Ilya Molchanov & Francesca Molinari, 2008. "Sharp identification regions in games," CeMMAP working papers CWP15/08, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  21. Victor Aguirregabiria, 2004. "Pseudo Maximum Likelihood Estimation of Structural Models Involving Fixed-Point Problems," Econometrics 0402003, EconWPA.
  22. Jones, Andrew M., 1994. "Health, addiction, social interaction and the decision to quit smoking," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 93-110, March.
  23. Ryo Nakajima, 2007. "Measuring Peer Effects on Youth Smoking Behaviour," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 74(3), pages 897-935.
  24. Stephen Ryan & Patrick Bajari & Han Hong, 2005. "Identification and Estimation of Discrete Games of Complete Information," Computing in Economics and Finance 2005 53, Society for Computational Economics.
  25. Jonathan Gruber & Jonathan Zinman, 2000. "Youth Smoking in the U.S.: Evidence and Implications," NBER Working Papers 7780, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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