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Reputation and Impermanent Types

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  • Thomas Wiseman

    () (Economics UT Austin)

Abstract

I consider a version of the chain store game where the incumbent firm’s type evolves according to a Markov process with two states: a “tough†type who always fights entry, and a “weak†type who prefers to accommodate. There exists a minimal level of persistence necessary for the incumbent to be able to sustain any reputation for being tough. Above that level, as the number of markets T increases, in equilibrium play alternates between intervals of entry by competitors and intervals of deterrence. When T is infinite, then regardless of the discount factor there exists a sequential equilibrium in which the incumbent’s payoff is bounded below her Stackelberg payoff. Both results are in contrast to the outcome when the incumbent’s type is fixed. One interpretation is that reputation is not permanent, but must be renewed occasionally

Suggested Citation

  • Thomas Wiseman, 2006. "Reputation and Impermanent Types," 2006 Meeting Papers 650, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed006:650
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ekmekci, Mehmet & Gossner, Olivier & Wilson, Andrea, 2012. "Impermanent types and permanent reputations," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 147(1), pages 162-178.
    2. Alp E. Atakan & Mehmet Ekmekci, 2012. "Reputation in Long-Run Relationships," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 79(2), pages 451-480.
    3. Renault, Jérôme & Solan, Eilon & Vieille, Nicolas, 2013. "Dynamic sender–receiver games," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 148(2), pages 502-534.
    4. Monte, Daniel, 2013. "Bounded memory and permanent reputations," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(5), pages 345-354.
    5. Johannes Horner & Dinah Rosenberg & Eilon Solan & Nicolas Vieille, 2009. "On a Markov Game with One-Sided Incomplete Information," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 1737, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
    6. Liu, Qingmin & Skrzypacz, Andrzej, 2014. "Limited records and reputation bubbles," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 151(C), pages 2-29.
    7. Daron Acemoglu & Alexander Wolitzky, 2012. "Cycles of Distrust: An Economic Model," Levine's Working Paper Archive 786969000000000502, David K. Levine.
    8. repec:eee:gamebe:v:109:y:2018:i:c:p:382-400 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Sharma, Priyanka, 2017. "Is more information always better? A case in credit markets," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 134(C), pages 269-283.
    10. repec:eee:eecrev:v:98:y:2017:i:c:p:424-441 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Ekmekci, Mehmet, 2011. "Sustainable reputations with rating systems," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 146(2), pages 479-503, March.
    12. Andrew Mell, 2015. "Fooling Some of the People Some of the Time: Reputation Management and Optimal Betrayal," Economics Series Working Papers 770, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    reputation; chain store game;

    JEL classification:

    • D7 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making
    • D82 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Asymmetric and Private Information; Mechanism Design

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