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Non-Renewable Resources and the Possibility of Sustainable Economic Development in a Positive or Negative Population Growth Economy

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  • Sasaki, Hiroaki

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to investigate how the long-run growth rate of per capita output is determined when an economy is subject to non-renewable resource constraints and the population growth is negative by using a theoretical model. From this, we can examine the effect of population decline and the effect of depletion of natural resources on economic growth. Our results show that irrespective of whether the population growth rate is positive or negative, the long-run growth rate of per capita output can be positive depending on conditions. This result suggests that even an economy with non-renewable resources and declining population can obtain sustainable economic growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Sasaki, Hiroaki, 2019. "Non-Renewable Resources and the Possibility of Sustainable Economic Development in a Positive or Negative Population Growth Economy," MPRA Paper 92204, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:92204
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    Cited by:

    1. Sasaki, Hiroaki & Mino, Kazuo, 2021. "Effects of Exhaustible Resources and Declining Population on Economic Growth with Hotelling's Rule," MPRA Paper 107787, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Kazuo Mino & Hiroaki Sasaki, 2021. "Long-Run Consequences of Population Decline in an Economy with Exhaustible Natural Resources," KIER Working Papers 1062, Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    non-renewable resources; declining population; endogenous growth;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • O44 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Environment and Growth
    • Q32 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - Exhaustible Resources and Economic Development
    • Q43 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Energy and the Macroeconomy

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