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Do the Elderly Support Public Educational Expenditure? An Empirical Analysis Focusing on the Characteristics of Spending

Author

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  • Miyaki, Miki
  • Kimura, Masaki

Abstract

This paper investigates the preferences of the elderly with respect to local public educational expenditures at the kindergarten, primary school, junior high school and high school stages in Japan focusing on the characteristics of expenditures. We applied dynamic estimation method to the data of educational expenditures after the latter half of the 1990s, during which period the aging factor would have been likely to have had a negative relationship with educational expenditure. According to the estimation results, the elderly population would not support an increase in current expenditures composed mainly of personnel expenses at every educational stage but would support capital expenditures of junior high and high schools, which consists of construction costs mostly.

Suggested Citation

  • Miyaki, Miki & Kimura, Masaki, 2018. "Do the Elderly Support Public Educational Expenditure? An Empirical Analysis Focusing on the Characteristics of Spending," MPRA Paper 89225, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:89225
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/89225/1/MPRA_paper_89225.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    population aging; educational expenditures; local governments; current and capital expenditures;

    JEL classification:

    • H7 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations
    • H72 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - State and Local Budget and Expenditures
    • H75 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - State and Local Government: Health, Education, and Welfare
    • I22 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Educational Finance; Financial Aid

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