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The Effects of Demographic Change on Public Education in Japan

In: The Economic Consequences of Demographic Change in East Asia, NBER-EASE Volume 19

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  • Fumio Ohtake
  • Shinpei Sano

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Fumio Ohtake & Shinpei Sano, 2010. "The Effects of Demographic Change on Public Education in Japan," NBER Chapters,in: The Economic Consequences of Demographic Change in East Asia, NBER-EASE Volume 19, pages 193-219 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:8169
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    File URL: http://www.nber.org/chapters/c8169.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. James M. Poterba, 1997. "Demographic structure and the political economy of public education," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(1), pages 48-66.
    2. Ueli Grob & Stefan C. Wolter, 2007. "Demographic Change and Public Education Spending: A Conflict between Young and Old?," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(3), pages 277-292.
    3. Sugimoto, Yoshiaki & Nakagawa, Masao, 2010. "From duty to right: The role of public education in the transition to aging societies," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(1), pages 140-154, January.
    4. Brunner, Eric & Balsdon, Ed, 2004. "Intergenerational conflict and the political economy of school spending," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(2), pages 369-388, September.
    5. Mark Gradstein & Moshe Justman & Volker Meier, 2004. "The Political Economy of Education: Implications for Growth and Inequality," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262072564, January.
    6. Rubinfeld, Daniel L, 1977. "Voting in a Local School Election: A Micro Analysis," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 59(1), pages 30-42, February.
    7. Hoxby, Caroline M, 1998. "How Much Does School Spending Depend on Family Income? The Historical Origins of the Current School Finance Dilemma," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(2), pages 309-314, May.
    8. Oberndorfer, Ulrich & Steiner, Viktor, 2006. "Intergenerational Conflict, Partisan Politics, and Public Higher Education Spending: Evidence from the German States," IZA Discussion Papers 2417, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Harris, Amy Rehder & Evans, William N. & Schwab, Robert M., 2001. "Education spending in an aging America," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 81(3), pages 449-472, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:spr:jopoec:v:31:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s00148-018-0690-3 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Sugimoto, Yoshiaki & Nakagawa, Masao, 2010. "From duty to right: The role of public education in the transition to aging societies," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(1), pages 140-154, January.
    3. Saito, Hitoshi, 2017. "The effects of population ageing on public education in Japan : A reinterpretation using micro data," MPRA Paper 79848, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Miyaki, Miki & Kimura, Masaki, 2018. "Do the Elderly Support Public Educational Expenditure? An Empirical Analysis Focusing on the Characteristics of Spending," MPRA Paper 89225, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Shimasawa, Manabu & Oguro, Kazumasa & Toyoda, Nao, 2014. "Does Japan have a Gray Democracy? An empirical analysis of prefectural data," CIS Discussion paper series 615, Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.

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