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Growth Cycles, Network Effects, and Intersectoral Dependence: An Agent-Based Model and Simulation Analysis

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  • Heinrich, Torsten

Abstract

An agent-based model of economic growth and technological change with network effects is proposed. The dynamics generated by network externalities are self-reinforcing and may bring about rapid growth, but will also for some time prevent further innovation. This circular pattern may appear in different economic sectors (or regions), may synchronize and resonate between sectors. This gives rise to growth waves on the macro-level and may be a novel approach to explain growth cycles. The paper uses an agent-based model for the study of single sector industry dynamics. This design is extended into a multi-sector version with an intersectoral effect on the network externality terms. The model is then simulated both with interconnected (with different network structures) and - as a control treatment - with isolated sectors. The emerging wave pattern on the macro-level is analyzed using both the autocorrelation spectrum and the frequency spectrum obtained with a fast Fourier transformation (FFT) of the simulation's output data.

Suggested Citation

  • Heinrich, Torsten, 2015. "Growth Cycles, Network Effects, and Intersectoral Dependence: An Agent-Based Model and Simulation Analysis," MPRA Paper 79575, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 08 Jun 2017.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:79575
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/79575/1/MPRA_paper_79575.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Growth Cycles; Network Externalities; Technological Change; Multisector Growth Models; Agent-Based Modeling;

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E37 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models

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