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A Simple Model on Mothers’ Autonomy, Health Inputs, and Child Health

Author

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  • Mandal, Biswajit
  • Bhattacharjee, Prasun
  • Banerjee, Souvik

Abstract

Using traditional health capital model of Grossman (1972) and Wagstaff (1986a) this paper attempts to fill in the theoretical missing link between mothers’ autonomy and household consumption behavior, particularly focusing on the consumption of child health inputs. It has been shown in this analysis that working mothers’ children should be of better health status. Further independent of working status of the mother, the autonomy parameter always induces consumption of more health inputs for the children. However, when autonomy is linked with mothers’ income, the basic results of the model are further strengthened. In fact, income induced autonomy may result in redefining the composite consumption good for the family as an inferior one.

Suggested Citation

  • Mandal, Biswajit & Bhattacharjee, Prasun & Banerjee, Souvik, 2016. "A Simple Model on Mothers’ Autonomy, Health Inputs, and Child Health," MPRA Paper 76360, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:76360
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/76360/1/MPRA_paper_76360.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Doan, Rebecca Miles & Bisharat, Leila, 1990. "Female autonomy and child nutritional status: The extended-family residential unit in Amman, Jordan," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 31(7), pages 783-789, January.
    2. E. Miller, Jane & V. Rodgers, Yana, 2009. "Mother’s Education and Children’s Nutritional Status: New Evidence from Cambodia," Asian Development Review, Asian Development Bank, vol. 26(1), pages 131-165.
    3. Duncan Thomas, 1990. "Intra-Household Resource Allocation: An Inferential Approach," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 25(4), pages 635-664.
    4. Engle, Patrice L., 1993. "Influences of mothers' and fathers' income on children's nutritional status in Guatemala," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 37(11), pages 1303-1312, December.
    5. Matthias Doepke & Michèle Tertilt, 2010. "Does Female Empowerment Promote Economic Development?," Working Papers id:3189, eSocialSciences.
    6. Matthias Doepke & Michèle Tertilt, 2010. "Does Female Empowerment Promote Economic Development?," Working Papers id:3189, eSocialSciences.
    7. Grossman, Michael, 1972. "On the Concept of Health Capital and the Demand for Health," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 80(2), pages 223-255, March-Apr.
    8. Lupin Rahman & Vijayendra Rao, 2004. "The Determinants of Gender Equity in India: Examining Dyson and Moore's Thesis with New Data," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 30(2), pages 239-268, June.
    9. Chiappori, Pierre-Andre, 1988. "Nash-Bargained Households Decisions: A Comment," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 29(4), pages 791-796, November.
    10. Basu, Alaka Malwade & Stephenson, Rob, 2005. "Low levels of maternal education and the proximate determinants of childhood mortality: a little learning is not a dangerous thing," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 60(9), pages 2011-2023, May.
    11. Anindita Chakrabarti, 2012. "Determinants of child morbidity and factors governing utilization of child health care: evidence from rural India," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(1), pages 27-37, January.
    12. Anderson, Siwan & Eswaran, Mukesh, 2009. "What determines female autonomy? Evidence from Bangladesh," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(2), pages 179-191, November.
    13. Frost, Michelle Bellessa & Forste, Renata & Haas, David W., 2005. "Maternal education and child nutritional status in Bolivia: finding the links," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 60(2), pages 395-407, January.
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    15. Michael Grossman, 1999. "The Human Capital Model of the Demand for Health," NBER Working Papers 7078, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    mothers’ autonomy; child health; health demand; behavioral factors;

    JEL classification:

    • D1 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior
    • D11 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Theory
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health

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