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Determinants of Low Birth Weight a Cross Sectional Study: In Case of Pakistan

Author

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  • Ghouse, Ghulam
  • Zaid, Muhammad

Abstract

This study investigates the impact of different independent factors on birth weight of infant. The Demographic and Health Survey of Pakistan (PDHS) 2014 data are used for empirical analysis. Binomial Logit Regression is employed for analysis. The analysis revealed the significant relationship of birth weight with mother’s education; Mother’s working status, wealth index of family, gender of child, Place of residence, age of mother at first birth with birth weight of infant. The analysis also revealed that birth-interval, birth order and institutional place of delivery reduce the birth weight children. The male children are more likely to be suffering of low birth weight as compare to female children. As far as mother’s education level, her employment and wealth status increases the risk of low birth weight decreases. It has important policy implications that at least mother’s education should be part of the education policy of Pakistan. The proper medical facilities should be provided at rural areas to decrease the risk of low birth weight and child mortality as well. From the policy perspective the education on birth order and birth interval should be arranged for awareness of parents. For the long-run the socioeconomic status of the household expressed by wealth index is needed.

Suggested Citation

  • Ghouse, Ghulam & Zaid, Muhammad, 2016. "Determinants of Low Birth Weight a Cross Sectional Study: In Case of Pakistan," MPRA Paper 70660, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:70660
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Birth weight; infant; wealth index; Birth Interval and logistic model;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I0 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - General
    • I3 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty

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